Tuesday, 31 March 2015

Lessons from the Stasi – A cautionary tale on mass surveillance | Amnesty International



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FBI probes cyberattacks at Rutgers University, Farleigh Dickinson | cyber war desk



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WHY CYBERSECURITY DOLLARS DO NOT ADD UP AT THE PENTAGON | cyber war desk



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What happens with data from mobile health apps? | cyber war desk



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Walsh College Presents Brigadier General Stone On Cybersecurity | cyber war desk



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Youngest siblings cleared exam of Certified Ethical Hackers | cyber war desk



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Is YOUR Uber account at risk? Thousands of details are being sold on the dark web | cyber war desk



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Google joins Apple, others in calling for spying controls, as Patriot Act vote nears - CNET



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Anonymous hacker group threatens Israel with ‘cyber-holocaust’ | cyber war desk



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​Pentagon chief may ease enlistment standards | cyber war desk



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CYBER SECURITY FOR BUSINESS LEADERS Cyber what? (part 2 of 2) | cyber war desk



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CYBER SECURITY FOR BUSINESS LEADERS Cyber what? (part 2 of 2)

National Cybersecurity Institute at Excelsior College Announces New Book: Cybersecurity in Our...



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Citizen broadband, DHS duplication and more -- FCW



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Monday, 30 March 2015

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Maybe The Best Way To Stop All This Swatting Is To Have Fewer SWAT Teams? | Techdirt



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The feds want Reddit to rat on its dark web forum members



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2 U.S. agents charged with fraud during Silk Road inquiry



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The Government Says It Has a Policy on Disclosing Zero-Days, But Where Are the Documents to...



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Two feds who investigated Silk Road accused of stealing from it, too



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Two feds who investigated Silk Road accused of stealing from it, too



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United States: FISMA II: A New Cyber World Framework To Strengthen Agency Information Security |...



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On the cutting edge: Hackers experiment with technology during Penn State event | cyber war desk



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On the cutting edge: Hackers experiment with technology during Penn State event

— Hundreds of college hackers descended upon the Penn State campus this weekend, but they weren’t involved in any illegal activities.


Instead, these hackers looked to network, experiment with technology and learn.


“Hacking in this sense is finding a creative solution to a problem,” said Jon Gottfried, of Major League Hacking.


His organization sanctions about 150 events worldwide like the one Saturday and Sunday at Penn State, he said. Called Hackathons, Gottfried described them as “invention marathons” where teams of participants have 24 hours to work on a project that would solve a problem, create something or improve existing products using technology.


The event, held in the IST Building, drew students from as far away as MIT, Rutgers and the University of Pennsylvania. Some select high school students also compete in hacking events, Gottfried said.


The organization works with students at each university to set up events, Gottfried said. Sophomore Albert Guo was one of the organizers of this year’s event and said more than 400 participants took part this year, an increase of about 200 from last year.


Seniors Joshua Lee, Dylan Nguyen and Sujeet Bhandari, computer science students at Penn State, had competed in Hackathons on campus before, and this year, the trio constructed goggles that enabled the wearer to make 3-D drawings with their hands.


Although it looked like something from “Tron” or another science fiction movie, the device could be used in 3-D modeling in a field like engineering, Lee said. Current 3-D modeling programs are complicated to use, Lee said. The goggles could simplify that to the point anyone could use them merely by pointing, he said.


“You need a lot of technical knowledge with the current technology,” Lee said. “This would eliminate that cliff.”


A few tables down from the goggles stood a reading lamp and a coffee maker wired to a computer. Doctoral student Ken Hutchison operated the appliances using commands on the screen.


Sipping a cup of the remotely brewed coffee, Hutchison explained the program to event judges and interested spectators. Unlike most home automation systems, which run using Wi-Fi, the one on display Sunday used radio frequencies. Hutchison said the current systems available commercially use a lot of circuitry, are expensive to buy and install, and require a lot of energy to use. Special appliances equipped with Wi-Fi receivers are also needed, he said.


The radio equipment used by his team can be used with less expensive, standard analog or digital appliances, and the entire cost of the circuitry to install the radio receivers and transmitters is about $17, Hutchison said. By changing the model from Wi-Fi-based to one using radio, or a hybrid of the two, the technology could be made more widely available, he said.


“We want to bring it to more people,” Hutchison said. “Right now, it’s only available to the super wealthy.”


For others, the project was a matter of fun and games. Penn State juniors William Bittner, Paul Jang, Nick Denaro and Drew Lopreiato designed a website where users can log on to play the classic video game Pong. The first-time Hackathon participants then synced the game to a piece of poster board wired with dozens of LED lights. The lights on the board reflected the actions of the players competing on their cellphones.


The site and board took about 17 hours to create, they said, and any old arcade game could be used.


“Any classic kind of game, like Snake, you could do with this kind of resolution,” Denaro said.


Projects are judged at each event and prizes are awarded to winners, Gottfried said, but the primary motivation he has heard from most participants is the chance to work with like-minded people and also network with tech industry representatives. Local startups as well as companies like Microsoft were present this weekend.


Technology companies, like Dell, sponsor the events and provide tools and equipment that might be available in class or for personal use, Gottfried said. That’s something else welcomed by participants. The gear that went into the 3-D drawing goggles was supplied through the event and new to the hackers that used the supplies.


“It’s the first time we’ve worked with this technology,” Lee said. “It’s exciting to work with new things.”







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Hackers Find Their Way Into British Airways Frequent-Flier Accounts | cyber war desk



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Feds Charged With Stealing Money During Silk Road Investigation



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Sarawak Report claims attack by hackers after articles go missing | cyber war desk



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DIS Director Mark Myers on Arkansas’ Top Cybersecurity Threat | cyber war desk



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Coding forum Github hit by cyber attack | cyber war desk



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Cyber warfare poses serious threat to global peace and security: IPU Assembly | cyber war desk



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Cybercrime Bill will help curb vice – Nkoma | cyber war desk



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Where does the word cyber come from? | cyber war desk



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Governor ups license plate data retention to 60 days from seven



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Dispatch from the cyber war | cyber war desk



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NSA Considered Ending Phone Spying Before the Edward Snowden Leaks



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New Zealand Under Fire For GCSB Spying Claims; Brazil Summons NZ Ambassador To Explain



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Why the Political System is Broken and How We Can Fix it.



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Sunday, 29 March 2015

The “Five Eyes”: a Global Strategy for a Panoptic State. — Sukhvir Gill



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Kaspersky: "I Have Never Met Putin"



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Before Edward Snowden Leaks, NSA Mulled Ending Phone Program



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Five things that could kill Internet rules



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Cybrary: A Free IT and Cyber Security Education Platform



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Power, Information, Google and the Obama Administration | VDARE.COM



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Shreya Singhal: The student who took on India's internet laws



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Katko Questions Witnesses at Hearing on TSA Pre-Check

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Saturday, 28 March 2015

Facebook vs Ireland case will soon call our bluff



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FCC Chair: Net Neutrality Is "Right Choice" Because Big ISPs Want "Unfettered Power"



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McCaul Opening Statement at Hearing on DHS OIG’s Report Regarding Deputy Secretary Mayorkas

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POPI regulator could mitigate cybercrime | cyber war desk



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CYBER INSURANCE IS GAINING ATTENTION IN THE UK | cyber war desk



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N.J. school district’s ‘bitcoin hostage” problem caused by weak passwords, firewall holes |...



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Firms need to consider cyber exposure as high-risk priority | cyber war desk



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ROBERT CARET: Cybersecurity is an investment in national security | cyber war desk



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News from the Hill:Cyber Warfare | cyber war desk



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U.S. Plans to Win a Cyberwar against Russia and China with DARPA’s ‘Plan X’ | cyber war desk



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U.S. Plans to Win a Cyberwar against Russia and China with DARPA’s ‘Plan X’

The world’s strongest military power intends to focus more of its massive resources on winning a future cyberwar against its strategic enemies, Russia and China, with a trio of sophisticated programs its foes cannot match.


At the head of these technologies is the futuristic “Plan X”, one of three new programs that will allow the U.S. to prevail in any future cyber conflict, said Arati Prabhakar, head of the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency or DARPA.


“A significant advantage (in cyberspace), yes, I think that is something we can achieve,” she said, “by using these tools and techniques but also having the people that know how to use them, use them to great effect.”


The aim of these programs is to reverse today’s current situation where the cyberattacker always has the advantage over the cyberdefender.


Plan X is designed to give the U.S. military’s cyberwarriors greater visibility into their networks. It works by translating attacks into smart display graphics so they’re harder to miss. It will also streamline the military’s ability to defend against cyberattacks by building an “app store” where cyberoperations are stored, ready to deploy.


Plan X will give U.S. cyberwarriors instantaneous knowledge of the fact their network is being attacked. It’s the first major attempt to create an actual online battle space and will fundamentally shift the way the U.S. military operates on the virtual battlefield.


DARPA said the system is so simple to use that simply moving a hand across a flat, touchscreen monitor allows a user to analyze the health of the entire network or find rogue computers not supposed to be connected to it.


Attacks will be translated into rich display graphics and 3D visualizations so it’s impossible to miss them as they occur. Military specialists could defend against attacks by literally dragging blocks of code from a virtual shelf or marketplace similar to Apple’s App Store onto their network.


They may one day even use 3D visors like the Oculus Rift, a video gaming headset, to launch these operations in virtual reality.


Plan X is vital to winning against state-sponsored cyber threats because protecting U.S. networks from computer attacks is as important to the military as defending the country’s air, land, sea and space.


James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, said a potential compromise of online systems and theft of information is the No. 1 threat to US national security, more so than terrorist groups or weapons of mass destruction.


US military superiority does not carry over into cyberspace, said Gen. Martin Dempsey, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.


He noted the U.S. may have superior weapons and technology, but the asymmetrical nature of cyberconflict means increasingly sophisticated attackers will always have the upper hand against the defenders.


And the Pentagon is acquiring the brainy manpower to do just that. It announced last year it would triple the number of its cybersecurity professionals to 6,000 by 2016.


“The military takes young kids and gets them very confident in operating complex systems,” Prabhakar said. “Can we start building tools so that with a modest amount of training, a lot of people can understand and see what’s happening in cyber?”


DARPA is building another program to develop what Prabhakar describes as “provably correct software, systems that can’t be hacked for specified security properties.”


This program is particularly important to guard against those seeking to break into the operating systems of small unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones.


Another program is a Cyber Grand Challenge to automate defensive operations.


This competition with millions of dollars in prizes will have computers automatically defend against cyberattacks in “a much more scalable, machine-speed fashion than human beings typing as fast as they can,” said Prabhakar.


DARPA plans to have its computers compete against human hackers at a DEF CON conference sometime in the future.


“If we finish not last, I’m going to do a victory lap,” said Dan Kaufman, who directs DARPA’s Information Innovation Office.


Prabhakar said these three key programs are already encouraging those at DARPA building new frontiers in cybersecurity.


“When you start taking those pieces together, you start having some sense you’re driving your future a little bit.”


Details about Plan X can be seen on its Passcode, The Christian Science Monitor’s new section on cybersecurity at http://ift.tt/1DmkFDP.


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Regulators build Hurricane Sandy into cyber war games | cyber war desk



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Ellen Pao’s Statement On Losing The Kleiner Perkins Case: “The Battle Was Worth It”



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Gasp! China admits to having cyber warriors | cyber war desk



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Colorado Springs cybersecurity firm forms partnership | cyber war desk



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Congress Wants to Eliminate Protections for Some of Your Most Sensitive Records



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Colorado Springs cybersecurity firm forms partnership

Friday, 27 March 2015

A $50 device is breaking North Korean government’s grip on media



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'BoS: NSA is monitoring key internet routers - Puzzle Palace Author' - MARC



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Private Emails Reveal Ex-Clinton Aide’s Secret Spy Network



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Ellen Pao Loses Silicon Valley Gender Bias Case Against Kleiner Perkins



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Security Conundrum lecture series to end with view from Congress and the courts



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Jury: Kleiner Perkins not liable for Pao’s gender discrimination claims



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Really, Rupert?



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Quantum compute this—Mathematicians build code to take on toughest of cyber attacks | cyber war desk



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South Florida’s Efforts In The War On Cyber Recruiting | cyber war desk



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Quantum compute this—Mathematicians build code to take on toughest of cyber attacks

Washington State University mathematicians have designed an encryption code capable of fending off the phenomenal hacking power of a quantum computer.

Using high-level number theory and cryptography, the researchers reworked an infamous old cipher called the knapsack code to create an online security system better prepared for future demands.


The findings were recently published in the journal The Fibonacci Quarterly.


Quantum computers are near


Quantum computers operate on the subatomic level and theoretically provide processing power that is millions, if not billions of times faster than silicon-based computers. Several companies are in the race to develop quantum computers including Google.


Internet security is no match for a quantum computer, said Nathan Hamlin, instructor and director of the WSU Math Learning Center. That could spell future trouble for online transactions ranging from buying a book on Amazon to simply sending an email.


Hamlin said quantum computers would have no trouble breaking present security codes, which rely on public key encryption to protect the exchanges.


In a nutshell, public key code uses one public “key” for encryption and a second private “key” for decoding. The system is based on the factoring of impossibly large numbers and, so far, has done a good job keeping computers safe from hackers.


Quantum computers, however, can factor these large numbers very quickly, Hamlin said. But problems like the knapsack code slow them down.


Fortunately, many of the large data breaches in recent years are the result of employee carelessness or bribes and not of cracking the public key encryption code, he said.


A new public key code


Looking to protect future online information, Hamlin and retired mathematics professor William Webb turned to the long-abandoned knapsack code. To bring it up to quantum level – and possibly use it as a new type of public key encryption – the researchers first engineered new numbering systems for the code.


“We used alternate ways of representing numbers,” said Hamlin.


In effect, they created new digital systems with much greater complexity than society’s day-to-day decimal and binary systems.


“By using very complicated number strings, we produced a new version of the knapsack code that can’t be broken by the usual cyber attack methods,” said Webb.


As a result, Hamlin and Webb believe the redesigned knapsack code could offer a viable alternative for public key encryption with quantum computing.


Knapsack code


The knapsack problem is a theoretical puzzle dating back to at least 1897 and is very difficult to solve in its most general form.


“Basically, it asks if you have one big number (the knapsack) and lots of small numbers (objects), what is the subset of small numbers (or objects) that will perfectly fill the knapsack? The concept was used to create a code called the knapsack code,” explained Webb.


“The knapsack code was originally suggested as a tool for public key encryption in the 1970s, but it was broken by two different methods and people lost interest in it,” he said.


Webb’s idea to bring it out of storage was at first an intellectual exercise.


“Knapsack is a simple, elegant code but it was broken,” said Webb. “We wondered if it could be fixed and redesigned to be secure. The challenge was intriguing.”


Hamlin said they made corrections at the fundamental level of the code, which repaired many of its weak spots. This let it block a greater array of cyber attacks, including those using basis reduction, one of the decoding methods used to break the original knapsack code, he said.


“Basis reduction is a big hammer to use against this code and, after testing, we think it’s secure against this type of attack and would offer an alternative code for quantum computing,” Hamlin said.


Webb said although it still needs outside testing, the remodeled knapsack code holds promise for making future online computer transactions considerably more secure.

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North Korea’s cyber spies exposed: Inside the secretive cyber-warfare cell Bureau 121 | cyber...



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House Intelligence Committee Approves Cybersecurity Bill



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State agency hacked; governor calls for study, changes | cyber war desk



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New cybersecurity models driven by tsunami of data, devices | cyber war desk



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Hackers develop new applications to extort money through blackmailing | cyber war desk



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Hackers develop new applications to extort money through blackmailing

Since the advent of internet, there have been people who use the service for unethical extortion practices. With time the practice is just getting more sophisticated and wide spread.


According to a report by The New York Times, cyber-criminals have devised a new method to extort money by cheating netizens into fake applications that extracts all necessary information to direct the money to short-lived bank accounts.


Researchers from Trend Micro, a Texas-based cybersecurity firm, claim that the extortionists lure victims through popular chatting platforms like Skype, or KakaoTalk, an Asian chat service. The criminals then pretend to have bad internet connections and force the users to download malware-loaded applications that can extract critical information like contacts, passwords, and address books.


The technology used by these cyber-criminals is so sophisticated that in some cases they can even record and interrupt calls and texts on the device that contains the malicious application.


The Trend Micro team was able to trace a few developers of these applications by tracing their email, social media and bank accounts and discovered that most of the money from such operations go-betweens to China. The criminals use different bank accounts that last just for a few weeks. According to the researchers, most of the victims of these online cheating portals are from China and Korea. “The sextortion schemes we uncovered are complex operations that involve people across cultures and nations working together to effectively run a very lucrative business,” the researchers wrote in their reporters said.

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MWR:Calling all hackers | cyber war desk



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Deployment of Controversial Urban Sensor System Aided by Aggressive Lobbying - The Intercept



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Cyber Law Tracker: Protecting Cyber Networks Act Introduced by House Intelligence Committee |...



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Cyber Attacks 2015 – Conference at the Nicolaus Copernicus University in ToruĊ„ | cyber war desk



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Special ops troops using flawed intel software



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Thursday, 26 March 2015

Laws on owning and operating carding equipment for research purposes? • /r/cyberlaws



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Australian government minister: Dodge new data retention law like this



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DARPA’s plan for US military superiority in cyberspace



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Comey ‘With Tears’ Begs Congress For FBI Access To Americans’ Cellphones



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Non-executive directors have a responsibility to understand cyber security risks: report | cyber...



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States preparing cyber-attack options to cripple enemies’ infrastructure’ | cyber war desk



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Hackers attempt to shut down TN.gov | cyber war desk



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Hackers attempt to shut down TN.gov

NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) -


An Internet hacker who has already successfully shut down several government websites has now made an attempt on Tennessee.


It’s unclear if it’s a person or group, but whoever is using the Twitter handle Vikingdom2015 has been lurking online and shutting down government websites.


“Usually when they attack a website, they’ll do what’s called a distributed denial of services, which means they’re just bombarding the website with traffic coming from all directions and just overloading it, essentially taking it down,” said Eric Near, with Dynamic Edge IT Consulting.


The hacker took down several government websites in Maine and a news station’s website, presumably for reporting the problem.


The hacker then went online to brag about it, essentially taunting the victims.


“Bragging rights are a big part of it,” Near said. “A lot of it is just getting your name out there and getting publicity. Even if it doesn’t mean anything, it’s just an ego boost.”


The attempt on TN.gov was made early Wednesday morning. Vikingdom2015 tweeted, “RIP Tennessee.” Apparently the state had the necessary tools in place to block the attack.


Tennessee officials turned down an interview, saying they don’t want to encourage a second attempt.


“There are services that that site provides,” Near said. “For example, Tennessee has a number of different sites for the different departments, like registering your license plates online, things like that.”


IT specialists said whether it’s a personal computer or an entire business, people should take preventative measures.


“What we recommend here is just be careful with what’s coming into your email,” Near said. “If you see a specific attachment, don’t open it. It could cause an infection to get to your computer.”


Near said there are many others out there like Vikingdom2015.


“I would recommend checking with your IT department of your IT vendor on what sort of security devices you have in place to make sure this doesn’t happen to you,” he said.


Wednesday afternoon, Twitter shut down the Vikingdom2015 Twitter account.

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Considering following the career path to cyber security, but I have a few questions. •...



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Anti-Israeli hackers threaten to mount ‘electronic Holocaust': report | cyber war desk



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How to Stay One Step Ahead of Hackers | cyber war desk



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Google Joins Tech Giants to Call for Mass Surveillance Reform



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Over 600 Russian Internet resources have been attacked by ISIL hackers | cyber war desk



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Act on this retired FBI agent’s cybersecurity advice | cyber war desk



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Cyber attack could draw military response from NATO | cyber war desk



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United States: A New Cyber World Framework To Strengthen Agency Information Security | cyber war...



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Justification for arming rebels in Ukraine and Syria under the spotlight | cyber war desk



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Google Inc (GOOGL)’s Visits to the White House Questioned - Insider Monkey



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Wednesday, 25 March 2015

Tech Giants Call For “Clear, Strong And Effective End” To NSA’s Phone Metadata Surveillance



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Ellen Pao wanted “a multimillion dollar payout” Kleiner lawyers contend



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Tech Giants Call For “Clear, Strong And Effective End” To NSA’s Phone Metadata Surveillance



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Did Vigilantes Knock North Korea Offline? | cyber war desk



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Did Vigilantes Knock North Korea Offline?

Amazon-Owned Streaming Site Twitch Is Hacked | cyber war desk



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Cyber Liability Insurance Can Help Protect Business Owners from Online Security Challenges |...



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Protecting the power grid in Maine from attacks | cyber war desk



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PolitiFact: Hackers solely responsible for state testing delay? | cyber war desk



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Survey: Many IT decision makers in UAE expect to be hit by cyber attacks in 2015 | cyber war desk



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CYBER INSURANCE CONTINUES TO GAIN ATTENTION THROUGHOUT THE WORLD | cyber war desk



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A clarion call to prepare for cyberwar. But what’s the threat? | cyber war desk



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SC strikes down sec 66A of IT Act, says it's unconstitutional



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CYBER SECURITY FOR BUSINESS LEADERS | cyber war desk



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Opinion: The chilling reality of China’s cyberwar on free speech | cyber war desk



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All Austrian Parties in Parliament Back Measures Against NSA, GCHQ Spying / Sputnik International



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Tuesday, 24 March 2015

Hackers Attack UNT Website | cyber war desk



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The Future of Government Action on Cybersecurity | cyber war desk



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Cybersecurity Firms Are Ready To Fight For Government Contracts | cyber war desk



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Cybersecurity Firms Are Ready To Fight For Government Contracts

Cyber attacks have become one of the largest threats to U.S. security, as more of the nation’s infrastructure has become dependent on the Internet. High profile hacking attacks against major companies and government agencies have been on the rise this year, leading the Pentagon to look for ways to prevent major security breaches moving forward.


This week, the Defense Department announced that is planning to focus heavily on cybersecurity measures designed to prevent attacks on U.S. weapons systems.


At The Federal Level


Assistant Secretary of Defense Katrina McFarland told Reuters that the Pentagon is working on a guidebook that will help program managers weigh out the costs and risks associated with the security of new weapons programs.


Related Link: Hacking Fears Boost Cybersecurity Shares


The Defense Department is also planning to announce new rules regarding acquisitions in order to promote data sharing and reduce the risk of being infected by malicious software.


Good News For Cybersecurity Firms


Increased focus on cybersecurity is likely to give big names that already have contracts with the Pentagon a boost this year. Lockheed Martin Corporation LMT and General Dynamics Corporation GD are already on the payroll as cybersecurity providers and will probably rush to meet this need.


More Bang For Your Buck


However, there is a lot of talk in Washington about ensuring the government gets what it is paying for. Many worry that big companies don’t have the specialized experience necessary to protect against the growing array of cyberthreats.


Raytheon Company RTN has been preparing for the shifting focus toward cybersecurity since 2007. In 2008, it acquired smaller cybersecurity firms Oakley Networks and SI Government Solutions to give it a better foothold in the online security field.


Consultants Name Drop


Consulting firms are also bidding for a piece of the government’s cybersecurity spending pie. Booz Allen Hamilton Holding Corporation BAH has a great deal of experience in this space and boasts a senior executive, Mike McConnell, who serves on President Obama’s Intelligence Advisory Board.


Deloitte Consulting is also making a play for government contracts by adding some big names in the cybersecurity community to its payroll.


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Twitch stitch-up: Game vid stream biz in hack alert, wipes passwords | cyber war desk



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Flaw in Cisco VoIP phones allows hackers to intercept conversations | cyber war desk



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Don’t believe tedcruz.org, Ted Cruz is not a Nigerian prince



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Flaw in Cisco VoIP phones allows hackers to intercept conversations

Cisco has issued a security alert warning users of several of its voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) phones that a flaw in the products could allow hackers to listen in on users’ conversations.


The company said the products at risk are the Cisco Small Business SPA series 300 and series 500 IP phones.


A vulnerability in the machines “could allow an unauthenticated remote attacker to listen to the audio stream” of the phones, according to Cisco. Software updates are not available at this time.


“The vulnerability is due to improper authentication settings in the default configuration,” a warning from the company said. “An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by sending a crafted XML request to the affected device. An exploit could allow the attacker to listen to a remote audio stream of make phone calls remotely.”


To exploit the vulnerability, an attacker may need to access trusted, internal networks behind a firewall to send crafted XML requests to the device. This access requirement may reduce the likelihood of a successful exploit.


Cisco advised It administrators to contact the vendor regarding updates and releases.

Administrators are also advised to enable XML execution authentication in the configuration setting of the phones.


Administrators can also use IP-based access control lists (ACLs) to allow only trusted systems to access the affected systems.

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So, you know those exciting movie-style 3D visual cyber attack ops centres? | cyber war desk



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SEBI to beef up IT team for probes, fighting cyber attacks | cyber war desk



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Preparing for Cyber War: A Clarion Call | cyber war desk



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DOCUMENTS REVEAL CANADA’S SECRET HACKING TACTICS | cyber war desk



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Vero Beach Distinguished Lecturer Michael Rogers to highlight nation’s risk from cyberwarfare |...



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Music Group Wants ISPs to Spy on Customers to Stop Piracy | TorrentFreak



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Facebook faces EU Court of Justice over user data misuse in wake of Prism spying scandal



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Supreme Court upholds free speech online, strikes down 'vague' Sec 66A of IT Act



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Monday, 23 March 2015

Only a matter of time before Snowden leaks kill U.S. intelligence operative, says Chambliss



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I Beat A Patent Troll And You Can Too



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All the Secret Ways You're Being Tracked That You Don't Even Realize



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US judge orders seizure of foreign domains owned by Chinese company



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Ted Cruz: ‘No net tax. Not now. Not ever’



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The US has started to put bounties on the heads of hackers



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Stealing Data From Computers Using Heat | WIRED



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Anonymous Operation Sky Angels

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Cyber IPO pipeline grows on security spending | cyber war desk



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Hackers deface Philippine police website | cyber war desk



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100 US military officers on ISIS hit list, Pentagon probes threat | cyber war desk



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Pentagon investigating online threat to US military by IS hackers | cyber war desk



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Hackers target Clarksville non-profit | cyber war desk



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FireEye: People, not technology, to blame in online cyberattacks | cyber war desk



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FireEye: People, not technology, to blame in online cyberattacks

A rise in cyberattacks can be attributed as an attack by people, as companies spend even more on boosting endpoint security. Many IT experts and business leaders see cyberattacks as a technology issue, but it’s really a focus on people.


Cybersecurity experts are increasingly focused on educating employees on spotting phishing attempts, and fighting against attacks that rely on employees being rather naive and reckless.



“When you do think of it that way, then you tend to do a bunch of bad things,” said Dave Merkel, CTO of FireEye, in a statement to ZDNET. “Such as ask bad questions to your security team like, ‘What product can I buy to make this go away?’ The answer is you can’t just buy a product that is going make the bad guys go away forever.”



To learn, companies must realize that cyberattacks will be a constant problem – and it’s an issue that simply won’t go away. However, they need to be aware that employees and the people in companies are responsible, while trying not to make excuses.


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Few UK firms have cyber insurance | cyber war desk



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Cybersecurity should be priority for businesses | cyber war desk



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US defence dept. issues new acquisition rules for cyberattack-proof weapons | cyber war desk



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Saturday, 21 March 2015

Anonymous Sits Down with KKK Leader Frank Ancona

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Drone packed with drugs, phones and knife flown into Bedford jail



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Is a lifetime of involuntary GPS monitoring constitutional?



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Google reportedly blackmailed websites into giving it content for free



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Cyber war intensifies between China and US | cyber war desk



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Tanzania: How Film Industry May Combat Cyber Crime | cyber war desk



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iSchool Welcomes 150 Students from 10 Schools for Cyber Defense Competition | cyber war desk



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Kapersky Lab Bloomberg Report: Founder Of Cyber-Security Firm Responds To ‘Russian Spies’...



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UNC Senior Selected to join Army in the Fight Against Cyber Terrorism | cyber war desk



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Netwars Brings Cyberterror to Life | cyber war desk



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In cyber war, lying is its own reward | cyber war desk



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Hackers Attack GreatFire.org, a Workaround for Websites Censored in China | cyber war desk



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CHINA REVEALS ITS CYBER-WAR COMMANDO SQUAD | cyber war desk



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Cyber talk: Dive on in | cyber war desk



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Friday, 20 March 2015

Access Denied / User Login | The Economist



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TDFCon - A Digital Forensics Conference • /r/cyberlaws



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China Let It Slip That Its Cyber Army Is Real | cyber war desk



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World Tech Update - Apple Watch, Chromebook Pixel, NASA rocket



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Target’s $10M cybersecurity lesson for other firms | cyber war desk



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Hackers expose private information of 50,000 VNPT clients | cyber war desk



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A little black box makes can beat your iPhone’s security system | cyber war desk



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China’s PLA dismisses US hack accusation | cyber war desk



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A little black box makes can beat your iPhone’s security system


HACKERS are a clever bunch and their ingenuity never ceases to amaze.



For as long as iPhones have been in development, there have been devices designed to crack passwords.


In the ultimate game of cat and mouse, iOS engineers are continually working hard to developed countermeasures.


The latest tool implemented is an option that clears a user’s phone of data if the wrong password is entered 10 times.


However, it appears hackers have already developed a way around this.


According to a post by security consultancy firm MDsec, there is a $300 black-market IP Box specifically set up to beat that system.


“It appears to be relatively simple in that it simulates the PIN entry over the USB connection and sequentially bruteforces every possible PIN combination,” MDsec wrote.


“That in itself is not unsurprising and has been known for some time.


“What is surprising is that this still works even with the “erase data after 10 attempts” configuration setting enabled.”


The company said by connecting directly to the iPhone’s power source, the IP Box is able to bypass the restriction by aggressively cutting the power after each failed PIN attempt.


As a result, the failed attempt is not synchronised to flash memory and hackers are free to try again.


The system itself is far from proficient because restarting the phone after every failed pin takes 40 seconds.


This means it would take up to 111 hours to bruteforce a 4 digit PIN.






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NSA Chief Says Cyber-Attackers Leaving Warning ‘Messages’ | cyber war desk



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Deep Panda at it again with Premera hack? | cyber war desk



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CYBER-THREATS AND NUCLEAR-THREATS: NORTH KOREA’S CONVOLUTED DIPLOMACY | cyber war desk



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CyberArk leads the fight as hackers hone in on business targets | cyber war desk



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By The End Of Their Recent #OpISIS Attack, Anonymous Hackers Have Released Over 9,000 Twitter...



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CyberArk leads the fight as hackers hone in on business targets

Thursday, 19 March 2015

Report: Mall of America used fake Facebook page to monitor activists



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Inside the Kremlin's 'troll army'



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New Jersey Governor Chris Christie Legalizes Tesla Direct Sales



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The iPhone’s best new puzzle game is about NSA surveillance



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Filming cops from within a 25-foot radius could be illegal in Texas



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Cisco helps customers to avoid NSA interception by shipping equipment to vacant addresses



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Congressman to FCC: Open Internet rules jeopardize the open Internet



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How lawyers can deter the cybertheft of commercial secrets | cyber war desk



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Corporate espionage – the internet’s new growth industry | cyber war desk



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AWA, access without authorization: Hacking and what it means to real estate | cyber war desk



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Investment set to boost UK’s cybersecurity capabilities | cyber war desk



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US Turns to Rewards in Hunt for Overseas Cyber Criminals | cyber war desk



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Fortinet: Well Positioned In An Increasingly Vital Industry | cyber war desk



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OVERNIGHT CYBERSECURITY: Privacy groups slam Senate cyber bill | cyber war desk



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The Wolf Is Guarding the Hen House: The Government’s War on Cyberterrorism | cyber war desk



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China Reveals Its Cyberwar Secrets | cyber war desk



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China Reveals Its Cyberwar Secrets

Silicon Valley is scary



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Vietnam PM to Visit New Zealand Amid Spying Allegations



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Wednesday, 18 March 2015

Cisco posts kit to empty houses to dodge NSA chop shops



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Appeals court revives Microsoft Xbox 360 console defect litigation



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Tesla Can Now Resume Car Sales In New Jersey



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Is Car Hacking Much Ado About Nothing? | cyber war desk



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Anonymous hackers list 9,200 ISIS Twitter accounts, enlist other hackers in cyberwar | cyber war...



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Is Car Hacking Much Ado About Nothing?

First, it was phone tapping, then computer hacking and identity theft. Now, the electronic fear du jour is car hacking. As our cars are powered by ever-increasing numbers of computers and software programs, and as automakers promote connectivity (from traffic-monitoring apps to mobile phone synchronization and collision avoidance systems), alarms have been raised about the possibility of hackers obtaining access to a car’s computers. One particularly bleak scenario involves hackers wreaking havoc on self-driving cars, whose hapless passengers won’t even have time to grab the steering wheel before their four-wheeled mobile devices engage rampage mode.


While nothing like this has happened in real life, researchers (including two individuals funded by DARPA for a 2013 study) have been able to access a vehicle’s computer systems using a laptop and, reportedly, obtain control of the vehicle’s steering, brakes, engine, and other components. While conducted in a controlled environment, these experiments caught the attention of Washington, D.C. and the media. A report released last month by U.S. Senator Ed Markey’s office, “Tracking & Hacking: Security & Privacy Gaps Put American Drivers at Risk,” mentions those experiments and concludes that no major auto manufacturer is properly prepared to handle the hacking and data privacy risks posed by existing and forthcoming automotive technology. Yet the report also noted that none of the automakers questioned by Markey had received any indications of hacking or attempted hacking in the real world. Is car hacking the next great security threat, or much ado about nothing?


Dallas attorney Marc Stanley takes the position that car hacking is a threat. On March 10, Stanley’s law firm filed a putative class action lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California against Toyota, Ford, and General Motors, alleging that those automakers’ vehicles are susceptible to hacking, thus breaching the manufacturers’ warranties and various state and federal consumer protection laws. The 343-page complaint requests injunctive relief (in the form of a recall or free replacement program), disgorgement, and other damages. As of this writing, the automakers had not responded to the complaint.


This lawsuit raises interesting questions. Since a real-world car hacking incident has never been reported, are the plaintiffs’ claims ripe? The complaint argues that the alleged ability of hackers to access vehicle computers renders false the manufacturers’ representations of their vehicles’ safety. Further, say the plaintiffs, since Toyota, Ford, and GM have refused to either repair the vehicles or replace them at no cost, the manufacturers have breached both express and implied warranties.


The argument that the vehicles at issue are not safe because they could be hacked is a creative attempt to circumvent the ripeness issue. But it seems likely that ripeness will present a large initial hurdle for the plaintiffs in this case. That a few researchers were able to access a vehicle’s computer system in a controlled setting is not necessarily evidence that the vehicles could be compromised by a malevolent third party, nor that such a hypothetical situation renders the vehicles unsafe to drive.


The plaintiffs have requested their money back from the manufacturers, yet they admit in the complaint that they are still driving their vehicles and make no assertions that the vehicles are otherwise unfit for their intended purpose. At this point in time, the plaintiffs’ allegations appear speculative at best.


This is not to say that automakers should not take the hacking threat seriously. The Markey report raises important questions about consumer safety that automakers would be well advised to attempt to answer. As cars increasingly become mobility devices, in which occupants can surf the Internet, download music and apps, monitor traffic and road conditions and the like, the proliferation of computer systems creates added risks, including hacking. That a vehicle has not been maliciously hacked does not mean that it could not happen or that it would not in the future. Should that happen, immediate media, political, and legal scrutiny will descend on the automaker at issue, who will be asked what it knew, what it should have known, and what safeguards it should have developed. All automakers have a common interest in preventing that day from ever happening.


To what extent will automakers remain responsible for the computer systems in their vehicles? Will those systems someday come with a separate warranty that is longer (or shorter) than existing bumper-to-bumper warranties? Will the consumer become responsible for updating firewalls, virus protection, etc.? If a vehicle is hacked and it is discovered that the owner had not brought the car in for service to have a software update performed, should the owner share the liability? Right now, these questions are being asked in the abstract. Sooner than we think, the answers will have real-world impact.


One issue raised by the Markey report but not included in Stanley’s class action is that of privacy. Vehicles record copious amounts of data, such as vehicle performance and geographic location. As drivers increasingly use their vehicles as an extension of their mobile devices, the proliferation of data stored in or transmitted through the computer systems will no doubt prove tempting to hackers. Indeed, it seems plausible that, in the future, a hacker might be more likely to attempt to steal your identity through your car’s computer than to try to disable your brakes or steering.


Interestingly, the Markey report expresses more concern with automakers’ use of vehicle data than with hackers. Given Washington’s interest in demonizing manufacturers since the General Motors ignition switch debacle, this is not surprising. Yet, it seems to paint only half the picture—the less concerning, though no doubt more politically convenient, half. Yes, automakers do record and store vehicle data, and may share some of that data with third parties. But Google and Facebook do the same thing, on a mind-boggling scale. To the extent vehicles record and store personal information, should Washington be protecting drivers from the automakers or from hackers? The hacking risk may be speculative at this point, while automakers’ collection of data is actually happening, yet the potential harm from hacking would likely be greater than any harm caused by automakers doing what all the major technology companies do.


In this brave new world of speculative but plausible threats, the best approach may be to stay calm and carry on and not let the premature panic or political pontificating obscure the fact that these issues are real and they do need to be addressed. But vehicles are not, and are not likely to become, mobile time bombs. Anyone interested in improving vehicle safety should start with the American public’s lack of driving skills. We have done an awfully good job of endangering ourselves on the roads already, with or without hackers.


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Why Data Encryption is Vital to Organizations | Telx Computers



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Need a cyberwar cabinet | cyber war desk



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Internet banking: a hacker’s ideal target | cyber war desk



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Internet banking: a hacker’s ideal target

Like Swiss Emmental cheese, the ways your online banking accounts are protected might be full of holes.


According to internet security software developer Kaspersky, the number of cyberthreats reached record levels in 2014. One in three computers or mobile devices were subjected to at least one web attack over the year.


Particular targets are companies or individuals using internet banking.


In January, a Swiss firm lost an estimated one million euros in an online financial transaction that was hacked.


The victim, an accountant at the company, was unaware of what was going on.


It started when he opened an email containing an attachment infected with a virus. Once they had taken control of his computer, all the hackers had to do was wait for him to connect online with his bank.


“When he tried to connect to his bank online, he activated the “Trojan horse”. A message appeared asking him to hold. For 20 or 30 minutes, he wasn’t able to use his computer at all. During that time, the pirates took control of the computer and carried out several money transfers onto foreign accounts,” says Frederic Marchon, spokesman for the Fribourg Police.


Plenty of viruses allowing that kind of illegal activity are available on the internet. The most updated versions are available for just over 1,000 euros on the darknet.


The hacker gets a warning as soon as someone connects with their bank online using an infected computer.


This IT expert explains how it works: “I can monitor all the computers I have successfully hacked, and I can see precisely, among them, how many are currently banking online and therefore vulnerable. So here, there are two which are currently connected,” says IT expert Cedric Enzler.


Faced with a growing number of cyber attacks on companies, Switzerland has set up an emergency centre to track the attacks and analyse them. But the nature of the centre means they cannot provide with any names or figures.


“It’s a really big problem. You’ve got to realise that anyone who wants to do harm and wants to make money that way will automatically turn to e-banking,” says IT security expert Max Klaus.


For this professor at the Bern University of Applied Sciences, there’s another big problem with this kind of cyber attack: most of the tools we use for internet banking like calculators or smartphone applications designed to read cryptograms are vulnerable to hacking.


“From an electronic point of vue, internet banking is safe. We use secure channels using SSL encryption. The problem comes from the client’s computer, its use no longer guarantees a secure connexion. Whether it’s a computer or a smartphone, hackers can take control and security is compromised,” says Professor Reto Koenig.


None of the banks contacted agreed to answer to our questions on camera.


Swiss banks warn their clients about security problems linked to the use of internet in their general conditions – a warning which often comes with a clause clearing the bank of any responsibility in the event of an attack.


“The client is a victim twice over. First, he’s the victim of a crook, and then he has hardly any chance to defend himself because of the general conditions in his contract. Sometimes, there are agreements between banks and clients but unfortunately, most of the time, these agreements are kept secret, they are confidential, so it’s hard to find out what the procedure is, which is of course detrimental to the client,” says Mathieu Fleury, of the Swiss consumer’s rights association.


A coordinated cyber security taskforce and response scheme, aimed at providing cyber security services for small and medium enterprises in Europe, is to begin pilot deployments in 2015, starting in the UK, the Netherlands and Belgium.


EU authorities are concerned about the vulnerability of SMEs because they employ two-thirds of Europe’s workforce.


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Dental company for low-income Oregonians says hackers got Social Security numbers, other info |...



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Bronx man confesses to laser pointer incident after cops arrest his housemate



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MSU begins implementing two-factor authentication for some accounts | cyber war desk



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Premera, Anthem data breaches linked by similar hacking tactics | cyber war desk



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Can Cyberwar Be Prevented? | cyber war desk



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GOP says Obama aides meddled in ‘net neutrality’



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Article :Top 10 Web Log Analyzers : Ethical Hacking, Pen Test Pune,India - Valency Networks



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Anonymous - The Fate of Humanity

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(ISC)² GISLA 2014 - Roberta "Bobbie" Stempfley

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Tuesday, 17 March 2015

PEW Data On Public Perception Of Intelligence Agencies Is Bias And False



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