Friday, 30 September 2016

Opinion: Cyber Conflict in the Oval Office

Finally, at long last, cybersecurity and cyberwarfare got the election year attention they deserve in Monday’s first presidential debate. Whether the candidates’ remarks inspired confidence, however, is a debatable question in itself.

It’s become a cliché in corporate America to say cybersecurity has mushroomed from an IT worry to a boardroom priority. Now the same is true in government: cyber security has become a key leadership issue. The next president will be forced up a steep learning curve.

“Our institutions are under cyberattack, and our secrets are being stolen,” said debate moderator Lester Holt. “So my question is, who’s behind it? And how do we fight it?” For the full article click here 



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Opinion: Cyber Conflict in the Oval Office

Finally, at long last, cybersecurity and cyberwarfare got the election year attention they deserve in Monday’s first presidential debate. Whether the candidates’ remarks inspired confidence, however, is a debatable question in itself.

It’s become a cliché in corporate America to say cybersecurity has mushroomed from an IT worry to a boardroom priority. Now the same is true in government: cyber security has become a key leadership issue. The next president will be forced up a steep learning curve.

“Our institutions are under cyberattack, and our secrets are being stolen,” said debate moderator Lester Holt. “So my question is, who’s behind it? And how do we fight it?” For the full article click here 



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How to trust your bank after Wells Fargo’s scandal

Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf is before lawmakers again, today, to answer tough questions about the bank’s practice where employees would use customers’ personal information to create millions of fake accounts without their knowledge.

And yesterday, California’s Treasurer John Chiang announced that he’s suspending the state’s business relationships with banking giant Wells Fargo for at least a year.

But what can the millions of Californians do if they still have a checking account or mortgage loan with Wells Fargo?

Take Two turns to financial advisor Delia Fernandez for advice on how to monitor your accounts for fraud and, if it comes to it, switch banks. For the full article click here 



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Thursday, 29 September 2016

40 percent of Polish companies lack any cyber-attack plan

Up to 40 percent of enterprises in Poland do not have an emergency plan for cyber attacks, according to research by Intel in the Central and East-European countries Poland, the Czech Republic, Romania and Hungary, carried out among 250 IT decision-makers from companies employing 150 or more people.

The best prepared are businesses from the Czech Republic, where 84 percent of respondents declared that their company has an emergency plan for cyber-attacks. In Romania, 72 percent of companies have such a plan, while in Poland and also in Hungary, it is 60 percent.

Besides, during the past six months, an incident such as malware or unauthorised access to company data was reported by 27 percent of big Polish companies (22 percent reported such incidents one to three times and 5 percent at least four times). In Romania the incidents were reported only in 18 percent of companies, in Hungary 29 percent and in the Czech Republic 36 percent. For the full article click here 



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Clinton vows to retaliate against foreign hackers

Hillary Clinton is vowing anew to respond to foreign hacking the same as any other attack against the United States. When she openly blamed Russia for recent U.S. cyber break-ins, Donald Trump wondered whether to blame overseas governments or overweight hackers working from home.

“She’s saying Russia, Russia, Russia, but I don’t — maybe it was. I mean, it could be Russia, but it could also be China,” Trump said during this week’s presidential debate. “It could also be lots of other people. It also could be somebody sitting on their bed that weighs 400 pounds, OK?”

These are the unanswered questions about how the U.S. government should defend itself after an attack in the internet age: Whether to fire back, how to fire back, and at whom? The Obama administration is still writing its rulebook. For the full article click here 



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Wednesday, 28 September 2016

What a real cyber war would look like

SAN FRANCISCO – Both U.S. presidential candidates have vowed to take on the world when it comes to cyber warfare. But full-scale cyber retaliation might be hard to spot and even harder to count as a win.

“Unlike a traditional war, there is no end where there are clear winners and losers, no physical flag to capture,” said Peter Tran, senior director at RSA Security in the company’s worldwide advanced cyber defense practice.

If the U.S. were to ramp up its counterattacks on countries it thinks are sponsoring hackers that breach American accounts, don’t expect a sci-fi digital armageddon. The target’s electric grid might still work, and so may the ATMs. Think of it more as a creeping worry that simple things we rely on can’t be trusted — the machines that count our votes, the total on our bank balance, our personal digital files. For the full article click here 



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On National Security, Trump and Clinton Found Plenty To Agree On

Much has been made about the differencees between the two candidates during last night’s debate: Donald Trump’s wild-eyed raving vs. Hillary Clinton’s calm poise; his waffling vs. her firm command of facts and figures.

When it came to the issue of national security, however, the candidates often seemed to be reading from the same playbook. Their convergence signals a bipartisan consensus on certain national security measures that is likely to carry on well past the election and into the president’s first term.

Cyber war

Both Trump and Clinton voiced the belief that the United States needs to be best in the world at cyber warfare. Clinton vowed to “make it very clear…the United States has much greater capacity” to wage such attacks itself. Trump agreed. “As far as the cyber,” he said, “we should be better than anybody else.” For the full article click here 



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Tuesday, 27 September 2016

Curious: Hillary Clinton doesn’t mention her famous reset button when detailing Russian cybersecurity threat

Secretary of State John Kerry, who recently failed to accomplish anything at the U.N. but look weak in the face of Russian aggression in Syria, famously led the ridicule of presidential candidate Mitt Romney for naming Russia as America’s No. 1 geopolitical foe.

Fast-forward through to the end of Barack Obama’s second term, and Hillary Clinton was spending a good portion of #DebateNight pointing to Russia as a major cybersecurity threat. Whoever served as secretary of state before Kerry must have screwed things up royally.

So, did Platte River Networks build that stupid reset button of hers? Everyone knows Russia is behind the recent attacks on U.S. government computer systems, and Hillary has a plan to fix that — maybe the Russians could fax it to her so she doesn’t have to ask Huma to print it from her Yahoo account. For the full article click here 



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Presidential debate 2016: Candidates pledge cyber investment, differ on Russia

In a brief exchange during the first of three presidential debates Monday night, Democratic candidaste and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump agreed on the importance of investing in cybersecurity and briefly sparred over whetherRussian hackers have a penchant for launching cyber attacks against U.S. targets.

Noting that the U.S. faces “two adversaries” – those hackers who engage in cyber espionage and nation-state actors, Clinton pledged that the country “will not sit idly by” as Russia, Iran, China and others ramp up their attacks. “We don’t want to get into another kind of war,” she said, but noted the U.S. will not back down. “Cyber warfare will be our biggest challenge.”

Clinton specifically called out Russian President Vladmir Putin for “letting loose hackers allegedly behind hacks of the Democratic National Committee(DNC) and others. For the full article click here 



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Monday, 26 September 2016

Experts warn on cybercrime’s increasing complexity

Morgan Stanley estimated in an April 2016 research paper that the market for cybersecurity products is expected to pass $60 billion this year and possibly double by 2020.

Despite this, there have also been a number of high-profile attacks in recent months in the financial industry. In February 2016, hackers succeeded in placing false instructions through the Swift network that resulted in $101 million being withdrawn from Bangladesh Bank’s account at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Swift, which provides the messaging network connecting the world’s banks, warned in late August that more banks are at risk from “persistent, adaptive and sophisticated attacks”.

While Swift declined to answer questions on the breaches, its chief information security officer Alain Desausoi highlighted the severity of modern cybersecurity threats. He said: “[Industry preparation is] overall better of course, but the threat has grown too, both in scale and in sophistication. In addition, the level of preparedness varies across geographies and, to some extent, between firms, which is problematic as the threat is borderless.” For the full article click here  



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Singtel expands collaboration with Palo Alto

Singtel and Australian subsidiary Optus have expanded their respective managed security services portfolios with a managed advanced threat protection service using Palo Alto’s security platform.

The new services are designed to monitor, isolate and prevent suspicious applications from breaching an organization’s networks or endpoint devices, and to provide advanced threat intelligence capabilities for enterprise customers.

Singtel’s managed security services business unit Trustwave provides services through a global network of eight security operations centers, integrated with Singtel’s Global Threat Intelligence.

Singtel employs 2,000 security professionals worldwide, including its SpiderLabs cyber response team. For the full article click here 



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Saturday, 24 September 2016

Is the Yahoo hack evidence of an international cyberwar?

On Thursday, Yahoo announced that they’re the victim of one of the largest data breaches in history, stating that 500 million accounts had been compromised. In their announcement, they also described the hack as state-sponsored.

With massive computing power, money and organized groups of hackers, nation states are uniquely positioned to carry out large scale attacks like the one on Yahoo, according to Shane Harris, a senior correspondent with the Daily Beast.

“The scale of this one is giving a lot of people pause,” he said. The fact that Yahoo described the attack as state-sponsored is a serious allegation that could warrant a response from the White House. That’s what happened after the Sony hack, which North Korea was held responsible for. In response, the U.S. levied sanctions against the country. For the full article click here



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The Myth of Cyber War

The esteemed Professor Mary Ellen O’Connell will give a talk on the cyber-kinetic needs of the United States in the ongoing efforts to remain on the forefront of the international arena.

This lecture will serve as a precursor for a Cyber-Security series that Professor O’Connell will be presenting at the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis. For the full article click here



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Friday, 23 September 2016

New Dædalus Issue on “Ethics, Technology & War”

Are we really safer?

Fox News reporter Judith Miller argued that the United States is safer after the 15- year anniversary of the attacks on September 11, 2001.

Miller cited NYPD Deputy Commissioner for Intelligence and Counter-terrorism, John Miller, who said that despite “individual strikes,” such as the Pulse night club shooting in Orlando four months ago, there has not been a large-scale terrorist attack since 9/11.

Harold T. Clark Jr. Professor Emeritus of Human Rights Scholarship and Advocacy at Utica College Theodore Orlin echoed a similar belief on the possibility of another mass attack on the U.S.

“I think that we are more able to protect ourselves from outside terrorist attacks,” Orlin said. For the full article click here 



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Thursday, 22 September 2016

From Estonia, lessons for the Age of Cyberwar

Long before Moscow became the prime suspect in the Democratic National Committee data breach, hackers tied to the Russian government have sought to sew political discord via the internet.

Most notably, many experts believe that in 2007 Russian operatives unleashed a series of devastating cyberattacks on neighboring Estonia following a dispute with Moscow over a Soviet-era war memorial.

At the time, Estonia had the world’s most connected society, giving attackers plenty of targets. They succeeded in taking down government computers, banks, and newspaper sites, trying to paralyze the “e-way of life” Estonians painstakingly crafted after the Soviet Union dissolved in 1991. For the full article click here 



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‘Cyber Cold War’ rhetoric raises alarms

When Congress blew back into town this month, so did a lot of bluster over alleged Russian-backed hacking of the Democratic National Committee and U.S. elections infrastructure.

In particular, House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Michael McCaul (R-Texas) raised the specter of a cyber Cold War with Russia and mutually assured cyber destruction.

But that rhetoric isn’t sitting well with cyber experts.

“It’s nuts, and it’s woefully uninformed about the cybersecurity world,” said Andrew Plato, cybersecurity expert and president of intelligence firm Anitian. “It’s Cold War thinking trying to be applied to Information Age structures, and it isn’t going to work. For the full article click here 



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Wednesday, 21 September 2016

US Air Force Sees Multidomain Command and Control As Critical

Multidomain command and control will be a critical factor in the way the US Air Force operates in the future, according to service officials.

The Air Force operates in the air, space and cyber domains, requiring seamless command and control across the three. In one regard, integrating and stringing together in and through each will require operational agility.

“That’s the ability to rapidly generate and shift among multiple solutions for a given challenge,” Maj. Gen. Thomas Deale, director of operations at Air Combat Command, said of operational agility, at the Air Force Association’s Air, Space and Cyber Conference.  For the full article click here 



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The cyber nuclear option that might already be in place

In late 2015, a top-flight online security expert made a startling discovery while investigating an attack on one of his corporate clients: A routine effort to hold the company’s data for ransom had exploited a path blazed more than a year earlier, yet the initial hackers had yet to cause any harm, despite pulling off an elaborate break-in. As the author and journalist William Langewiesche tells it in a new article forVanity Fair, “The only possible purpose, Opsec concluded, was that of a sleeper cell, lying in wait as a pre-positioned asset to be used as a last resort, like a nuclear weapon, in the event of an all-out cyber-war.”

Opsec, whose name is not really Opsec, is a “grand master” of hacking, “one of a small elite—maybe a hundred, maybe fewer.” He started when he was just a kid, back in the late 1980s. By 16 he was poking around Chinese government networks on the side for a customer at the Washington-area electronics store where he worked; he assumed the man worked for one of the US intelligence agencies. He gradually went straight and got into the cyber defense game, but only for serious clients. And it was in the network of one of these clients—an “Internet behemoth” that “streams entertainment online” but which Langewiesche refers to only as “the Company”—that Opsec discovered the “sleeper cell” breach last year. For the full article click here 



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Tuesday, 20 September 2016

Talk of cyberwar

By: Kevin Coleman, Independent Software,

It seems recently there has been a significant increase in talks of cyberattacks and even cyberwar. In fact, that discussion has even been tied back to another topic of war that was prevalent decades ago. I am referring to the subject matter of a “cyber cold war” with Russia. That phrase has certainly grabbed a few headlines in publications of late.

Now add to all those discussions of a World War III, or World War 3.0, as it’s been dubbed. If you only looked at the headlines, you might walk away with the notion that some clear act of cyber aggression has taken place and there is a strong potential for cyberwar to break out very soon, if not immediately.

No one would dispute that cyberattacks on business and government continue; and if you did not know better, you would have to say virtually unchecked. No one should dispute the threat of cyber terrorism or the continued theft of national secrets or proprietary and confidential intellectual property of defense contractors and general businesses, for that matter. The big question that keeps coming up again and again is: Does all of these cyberattacks rise to the level of war?  For the full article click here 



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In ‘Hackers – Join the Cyberwar’ You Hack Other Players’ Networks

With Mr. Robot‘s lead actor winning an Emmy last night, it is perhaps appropriate that we got a hacking game today.Hackers – Join the Cyberwar! [Free], which had a beta in our forums a few months back, lets you build a 3D network architecture and refine it as best as possible. You then use various tools you can build and upgrade to protect your network and also to attack various other networks around the world. In this hi-tech cat and mouse game, you’ll have to build a robust enough network to protect your data while finding the best tools to use against others.

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The game lets you attack other people’s networks using stealth or a battering ram and offers plenty of variety with security, activist, or terrorist missions. I’m glad to see hacking games becoming more popular because it is one of the most prominent threats globally. And hacking usually makes for great puzzle and tower defense games. The game is out now and it’s F2P. For the full article click here 



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Monday, 19 September 2016

90% of big firms hit by major cyber attacks – Lloyd’s survey

Nine in 10 big businesses in Europe have suffered a significant cyber attack in the past five years, a worrying indication that companies and their bosses are becoming more complacent about cyber security.

Lloyd’s of London discovered this in a survey of chief executives and senior bosses at 346 European firms with a turnover of €250 million or more, the Telegraph reported.

The survey also found that while 90% of big businesses have been hit by a major cyber attack, less than half are worried about suffering another breach in the future.

Lloyd’s CEO Inga Beale said the poll findings show that European businesses are complacent about cyber attacks and are at risk of paying multimillion-pound fines under new EU rules. For the full article click here 



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AFA’s Annual Air, Space & Cyber Conference: What to Expect

From revealing the name of the future bomber to new leaders outlining priorities, this year’s annual Air, Space & Cyber conference organized by the Air Force Association is sure to make some news.

Leaders will discuss the many challenges facing the service, including modernization in a time of budget constraints, deploying or training more with the smallest force the service has ever seen, increased drone missions, the air war against the Islamic State, and a hostile Russia encroaching on European partners.

Here’s a look at what’s to come at the conference kicking off Monday and continuing through Wednesday at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center just south of Washington, D.C. For the full article click here 



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Friday, 16 September 2016

How to Start a War With the Russians

In one of the most dumbfounding displays of militaristic insanity and sophistic stupidity we have ever read, a former NATO general and a Polish arms consultant have co-authored a highly subjective July 2016 foreign policy “analysis,” which, if it is implemented, will make a world war with Russia a near certainty.

By Ronald L. Ray

Far from being a sober policy review, “Arming for Deterrence: How Poland and NATO Should Counter a Resurgent Russia,” published by the Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security at the Atlantic Council, is a dangerous recipe for confrontation. The 25-page document lacks any bibliography and contains only 14 footnotes, of which only a few list information sources. Two of those, Bloomberg and The New York Times, are hardly scholarly.

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The authors of “Arming for Deterrence” (AD) are Gen. Sir Richard Shirreff and Maciej Olex-Szczytowski. Shirreff’s official biography notes he was “NATO’s deputy supreme allied commander Europe from 2011 to 2014. He is a partner at Strategia World-wide Ltd.” Ominously, “He recently published ‘2017: War with Russia.’ ”

Olex-Szczytowski was formerly an economic advisor in the Polish Foreign Ministry and is now an “independent” advisor “specializing in defense.” For the full article click here 



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The Cold War is over. The Cyber War has begun.

Contemplating Russian nuclear threats during the Cold War, the strategist Herman Kahn calibrated a macabre ladder of escalation, with 44 rungs ranging from “Ostensible Crisis” to “Spasm or Insensate War.”

In the era of cyberwarfare that’s now dawning, the rules of the game haven’t yet been established with such coldblooded precision. That’s why this period of Russian-American relations is so tricky. The strategic framework that could provide stability hasn’t been set.

Russian hackers appear to be pushing the limits. In recent weeks, the apparent targets have included the electronic files of the Democratic National Committee, the private emails of former secretary of state Colin Powell, and personal drug-testing information about top U.S. athletes. For the full article click here 



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Thursday, 15 September 2016

The EAU Says It Doesn’t Have Enough Trained Cyber Security Specialists

The UAE has to invest in training its own security pros as it has become a priority in the cyber-crime war, due to the amount to trained professionals dwindling.

The Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington recently stated that cyber-attacks in the region cost $1 billion dollars a year, and isn’t going to decrease. The institute also said that the Middle East was filled with cyber criminals with the widest use of technologies ad high-value targets.

V.P. of Cisco Middle East, Mike Weston said, “Although there were more than a million cyber security positions available worldwide, the shortage of professionals to fill them was likely to grow rapidly.”

Cisco’s Annual Security Report showed the deficit of cyber security workers would rise to 1.5 million by the year 2019. For the full article click here 



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Nation state-backed DDoS attacks targeting underlying internet infrastructure

The pillars that provide the basic infrastructure of the internet are being probed by an unknown entity that is probing for that point where the foundation cracks and the internet breaks.

Much like raptors did fences on Isla Nublar, these attacks are systematic and well-planned, seeking to understand the defenses employed by these vitally-important companies. “This commoditization renders businesses vulnerable to a higher frequency of attacks they can’t defend against on their own”.

THE INTERNET’S underlying infrastructure is being probed for vulnerabilities by unknown attackers using sophisticated DDoS attacks, according to security expert Bruce Schneier. For the full article click here 



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Wednesday, 14 September 2016

Cyberwar is here! Offense, defense and ‘special teams’

Analogies to NFL teams (offense, defense and special teams) as well as military special forces can be applied to organizing elite talent around a specific objective to the corporate cyber challenge each company faces.

If anyone is asleep at the switch and thinks cyber is just a fad or trend, then consider this: Ginni Rometty, chairman, president and CEO of IBM, recently said, “We believe that data is the phenomenon of our time. It is the world’s new natural resource. It is the new basis of competitive advantage, and it is transforming every profession and industry. If all of this is true – even inevitable – then cybercrime, by definition, is the greatest threat to every profession, every industry, every company in the world.” Do I have your attention now?  Analogies to NFL teams (offense, defense and special teams) as well as military special forces can be applied to organizing elite talent around a specific objective to the corporate cyber challenge each company faces. For the full article click here 



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Army wants cyber capability everywhere

The Army’s new cyber director said the service is still struggling to make cyber, electronic warfare and information operations tangible to warfighters.

Speaking at West Point’s annual Mad Scientist Conference, Brig. Gen. Patricia Frost said the Army’s “cyber mission force is on track,” but the service lacks a coherent electronic warfare strategy.

“For the last decade-plus, EW’s been very focused on [countering improvised explosive devices], which I’d say is a soda-straw view of where electronic warfare needs to be,” she added. “If we say we are going to fight in a contested and congested electromagnetic spectrum, what does that mean for the Army, and are we organized and equipped to fight well in that environment?” For the full article click here 



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Tuesday, 13 September 2016

Calls for Canada to develop cyberwar capabilities

Canada’s spy agencies and military should be upgraded to better carry out offensive cyber warfare attacks against “foreign adversaries,” a strategy paper published in July by a Canadian military think tank argued.

Titled “Canada and Cyber Warfare,” and written by retired Major General John Adams for the Canadian Global Affairs Institute (CGAI), the paper urges that Canada improve its capability to infiltrate, disrupt and destroy the computer networks of its foreign rivals.

Adams is the former head of the Communications Security Establishment (CSE), the country’s signals intelligence service. He has been a leading spokesman for the drive to expand the domestic and foreign powers of both CSE and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), Canada’s domestic spy agency. Adams has previously boasted of CSE’s deep integration in the US National Security Agency’s illegal spy operations, with the aim of “mastering the internet.” For the full article click here 



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Obama to be urged to split cyberwar command from NSA

The Pentagon and intelligence community are expected to recommend soon to President Obama that he break up the joint leadership of the National Security Agency and U.S. Cyber Command to create two distinct forces for electronic espionage and cyberwarfare.

The potential move is driven by a sense that the two missions are fundamentally different, that the nation’s cyberspies and military hackers should not be competing to use the same networks and that the job of leading both organizations is too big for one person.

Obama was on the verge of ending the “dual-hat” leadership in late 2013, but was persuaded to hold off when senior officials, including then-NSA Director Keith B. Alexander, argued against it on the grounds that CyberCom was still too dependent on NSA’s capabilities to succeed on its own. For the full article click here 



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Monday, 12 September 2016

5 Lethal Russian Weapons of War Ukraine Should Fear

The smoldering conflict in Ukraine’s eastern provinces has now gone on for more than two years. Although an uneasy status quo has settled on the region, skirmishes continue, and tension periodically run high. With the prospect of open, large scale conventional combat receding, the focus has shifted to the tactics and weapons that either side can use to press the other at the margin, to recapture a sliver of territory, or increase the temperature on the enemy. Here are five kinds of weapons that Russia uses to maintain pressure on eastern Ukraine, and Kiev as a whole.

Unless it decides to expand its incursion into Ukraine, Russia’s ability to hurt the Ukrainian government depends on its willingness to leverage airpower, economic power and cyber-power. Of the first of these, Russia has been reticent to carry out direct attacks against Ukraine with either aircraft or ballistic missiles. Given the weakness of the Russian economy, Moscow can offer less and less in terms of coercive economic statecraft. But in the cyber-arena, Russia remains dangerous. For the full article click here 



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It matters who counts the votes

The statement, “The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything” is usually attributed to the late Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin. Whoever said it, that thought is probably in the mind of Russian President Vladimir Putin as November 8 approaches.

For months, the reported hacking into Democratic National Committee emails and the release of confidential DNC documents has been linked to possible Russian cyber attacks. Last week it was revealed that U.S. law enforcement and intelligence agencies are investigating what may be a broadly-based covert Russian cyber operation designed to discredit and possibly interfere with ballot counting in the November election.

The election processes in Arizona and Illinois have reportedly been subjected to attempted or successful cyberattacks probably performed by the Russians. The FBI has reportedly alerted all state and local officials to the possibility of cyberattacks on the voting process. For the full article click here 



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Saturday, 10 September 2016

Cyber cold war a scary challenge

The Washington Post last week reported that U.S. intelligence and law enforcement authorities have determined that Russia has launched a broad covert operation to influence both the U.S. presidential election and perceptions about the trustworthiness of America’s leaders and institutions. While some of the recent high-profile hacks of U.S. institutions are murky, security experts believe, despite Kremlin denials, that the hack of the Democratic National Committee revealed in June was perpetrated by Moscow — not by the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks, which released a trove of embarrassing DNC documents.

Writing in The Hill last month, cybersecurity expert Tomer Weingarten said it appeared that Moscow and Washington no longer were attempting to hide the fact that a de facto war is being waged online — by both sides. He likened Moscow’s recent aggressiveness to Soviet attempts to put nuclear missiles in Cuba in 1962 — an attempt to determine how far it could go in challenging Washington. This ominous appraisal was underscored last week at the G-20 summit in China, when President Obama said that he had warned Putin that the U.S. cyber arsenal has “more capacity than anybody, both offensively and defensively” and had told him to “act responsibly and start instituting norms.” For the full article click here 



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Tech expert: Cyber war is real and it’s here

SCHERERVILLE — “Cyber security is a moving target, and there is no silver bullet.”

Robert E. Johnson III, president and CEO of Merrillville-based Cimcor, Inc. presented that stark message to guests at the Lake County Advancement Committee luncheon Friday at Teibel’s Restaurant. CIMCOR develops security, integrity and compliance software solutions and exports worldwide.

Hackers present ever-increasing threats to everything from the nation’s infrastructure to individual’s personal information, Johnson said. There are now 390,000 new cyber threats per day and it’s predicted that will increase to one million new cyber threats per day quickly. For the full article click here 



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Friday, 9 September 2016

WITH RUSSIA PARANOIA, CORPORATE MEDIA BECOMES SALES FORCE FOR CYBERWAR

The next Cold War is upon us. And, in what looks like an act of profound laziness, Russia is once again the focus of the establishment’s ire and dark fantasies.

In some sense this was inevitable. A significant portion of the US economy and political system is built on the existence of a restless national security state in constant search of threats. The Cold War provided all the pretext necessary to make the machine hum—expensive weapons systems, endless intelligence needs, and an animating existential danger to rally the people around entrenched elites. When it ended, lots of people in the old guard became unemployed, unimportant, and rudderless.

With 9/11 came some sense of normalcy for the national security state, but jihadists just don’t justify the F-35. In truth, they barely even justify the money needed to pay TSA agents to grab people’s junk at the airport. The US needed a new enemy, and one with deep pockets. For the full article click here 



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A Pure Play for the “World War 3.0″ Cyber Arms Race

President Obama and his generals have consistently put cybersecurity at or near the top of U.S. strategic defense priorities.

Ever since, the military and government have had their work cut out for them, fighting relentless, daily waves of computer attacks, in many cases against vital national interests.

The private sector is in the trenches, too, as state actors and individuals press attacks to get trade secrets or customer identity data.

Now, recent high-profile cyberattacks against the Democratic National Committee, most likely by Vladimir Putin’s intelligence services, have pushed the issue into “six o’clock news” territory. For the full article click here 



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Thursday, 8 September 2016

Blog: DNI Warns of Continued Troubled Cyber Wars

Cybersecurity will remain as much of a challenge for the next administration as it has been for the current White House, especially in light of the constant barrage of cyber attacks from nation states, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said Wednesday.

“The Russians hack our systems all the time, not just government but corporate and personal systems,” Clapper said on the inaugural day of at the Intelligence & National Security Summit (INSS) in Washington, D.C. The two-day conference, sponsored by AFCEA International and the Intelligence and National Security Alliance (INSA), runs through Thursday.

But for all the mounting global threats—to include those from China and North Korea—no matter who becomes the next president, “it will be OK,” Clapper said.

The next few months will be crucial for the United States as the nation prepares to elect a new president. “Any period of transition is a very vulnerable time for the country,” said Clapper, who plans to be “rolling out the door in the next four months” after six years as DNI. For the full article click here 



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Brookes: Russian bear just spoiling for fight

The Russians are at it again.

This week The Washington Post reported that Moscow may be hatching a secret influence operation to disrupt this fall’s U.S. elections, rattling trust and confidence in American government.
Pretty Cold War-like.

The Post reports the threat is credible enough that the director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, is leading an effort to determine if the concerns are justified.
Moscow seems to be focused on cyber methods. No surprise, really.

While the White House hasn’t fingered the Kremlin directly for this summer’s collection of computer capers, there have been plenty of hints that Russia is high on the suspect list. (Some cybersecurity firms have accused Russian intelligence actors.) For the full article click here 



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Wednesday, 7 September 2016

America’s Digital Dependency and the Capability/Vulnerability Paradox

Digital technologies are increasingly prolific and vital components of the U.S. Department of Defense weapons arsenal.  Since the early days of network-centric warfare in the 1990s, to the development of the digital “quarterback” F-35, and today’s Third Offset, the digital nature of the modern U.S. military has become an enduring and unquestioned characteristic.  And for good reason.  Digital advancements enable long-range strike, precision targeting, near real time intelligence-surveillance-and reconnaissance, and joint operations–all core capabilities of U.S. operational campaigns.

Together, these digital technologies have made the United States extremely capable to the point of dominance.  It, therefore, seems illogical to question the overall good of continuing to invest and utilize these technologies. Indeed the acquisition strategy proffered by the Third Offset appears to double-down on these digitally reliant technologies and operations.  However, the U.S. may be coming to a point in which the utilization of digital technologies that has made the U.S. so effective and so lethal has developed into a dangerous digital-dependency.  The danger is that with digital dependency comes both extreme capability and extreme vulnerability so that, paradoxically, the U.S. may at the same time be both more militarily effective and less secure. For the full article click here 



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Obama Warns Against Cyber Cold War

President Obama on Monday urged de-escalation of a potential arms race involving cyberweapons. The president’s remarks followed his meeting with world leaders, including Russian President Vladimir Putin, at the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, China.

The U.S. has more offensive and defensive capability than any other country on Earth, Obama noted.

Citing a new era of significant cyberwarfare capabilities, the president urged moving into a space where leaders begin to institute some norms to prevent global escalation from spinning out of control.

“We’re going to have enough problems in the cyberspace with non-state actors who are engaging in theft and using the Internet for all kinds of illicit practices, and protecting our critical infrastructure, and making sure our financial systems are sound,” Obama said, “and what we cannot do is have a situation where this becomes the Wild, Wild West, where countries that have significant cybercapacity start engaging in competition — unhealthy competition or conflict through these means when, I think wisely, we’ve put in place some norms when it comes to using other weapons.” For the full article click here 



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Tuesday, 6 September 2016

DISA unveils its premier facility for cyber defense

The home of the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) Global Operations Command has opened for business, housing the nation’s major facility for cyber defense.

The 164,000 square-foot complex, located on Scott Air Force Base, Ill., near St. Louis, Missouri, will bring together about 70 percent of the DISA command, said Col. Paul Craft, the commander of DISA Global in an interview on The Federal Drive with Tom Temin.

The business end of the operation will be expansive.  The command center will take the lead in operating the infrastructure and services that make up the DoD Information Network.  According to Craft, that includes For the full article click here 



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Obama to Russia, China: Let’s not hack each other because the US will win

Cyber security has become a very pressing concern over the past couple of decades, with state-sponsored attacks and malicious agents causing all kinds of trouble around the world. But president Barack Obama envisions a world where governments put aside their differences, and their zero-day stockpiles, and stop going after each other.

As reported by The Register, in a speech given in China, after a meeting with Russian president Vladimir Putin, Obama explained his desire for digital peace between major world powers. Citing the increased friction between the US, Russia and China on this front, Obama called for a de-escalation of tensions.

The US president also mentioned the stock-piling of “cyber weapons” in the form of zero-day exploits and digital attack capabilities, a cycle reminiscent of the Cold War arms race whose effects are still being felt today. President Obama explained For the full article click here 



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Monday, 5 September 2016

Azerbaijani hackers leak secret data from Armenian Intel server

AZERBAIJANI HACKERS FROM ANTI-ARMENIA TEAM HAS LEAKED HIGHLY CONFIDENTIAL DATA FROM ARMENIAN SECURITY SERVICE SERVER — THE ARMENIAN HACKERS ARE CALLING IT A FAKE SHOW.

The cyber war between Azerbaijan and Armenian hackers is as complicated and serious as one can imagine. While militaries of both countries are fighting for a piece of land, their hackers are targeting each other on the Internet.

The latest cyber attack comes from Azerbaijani hackers going by the handle of Anti-Armenia Team who claim to have hacked Armenian government servers including the Armenian national security ministry and leaked a trove of confidential data including passport copies of locals and foreign citizens who visited Armenia. For the full article click here 



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U.S. DoD needs “immediate action” to win the AI war

The Department of Defense (DOD) Science Board has released a broad study on autonomy, recommending “immediate action” to counter enemy artificial intelligence.

In the study, the science board found that commercial and academic AI is moving at a faster speed than military operations. It warned that if this continued, the U.S. military may face the same threats from adversaries that used cyber warfare to extract information from the Pentagon and other high value military targets, but on a much grander scale.

“For years, it has been clear that certain countries could, and most likely would, develop the technology to use cyber and electronic warfare against U.S. forces,” said the study’s authors. “Yet most of the U.S. effort focused on developing offensive cyber capabilities without commensurate attention to hardening U.S. systems against attacks from others.” For the full article click here 



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Saturday, 3 September 2016

Putin downplays DNC hack as Clinton calls for military action over cyberattacks

Russian President Vladimir Putin says everyone should just stop worrying about whether Russia hacked the email servers of the Democratic National Committee.

“Listen, does it even matter who hacked this data?’’ Putin said during an interview with Bloomberg earlier this week. “The important thing is the content that was given to the public.’’

“There’s no need to distract the public’s attention from the essence of the problem by raising some minor issues connected with the search for who did it,” Putin added of the cyberattack.  For the full article click here



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FBI Clinton docs give insight into cyberattack concerns

Pages from the FBI’s probe into Hillary Clinton’s private email server are giving more insight into the attempted cyberattacks on the server, as well as the concerns from Clinton’s staff – and the former secretary of state herself – that the homebrew arrangement may have been compromised.

FBI Director James Comey said in July that the government found no evidence that the server was hacked, but said that foreign governments were so sophisticated, and the server such a high-value target, that it was unlikely they would leave evidence of the break-in.

IT specialist Bryan Pagliano told investigators that while there were no breaches of the server, he was aware of many failed logins, which he described as “brute force attacks,” according to the report. He also told the FBI that the attempts increased as time went on. When asked, he said he could not recall if a high volume of failed logins came from a specific country. For the full article click here



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Friday, 2 September 2016

Clinton Advocates Response To DNC Hack That Would Likely Bring On WWIII

Democratic Presidential nominee warned foreign governments and hackers Wednesday that cyber attacks against the U.S. will be treated like any other, even if it leads to war.

“As President, I will make it clear that the United States will treat cyber attacks just like any other attack. We will be ready with serious political, economic, and military responses,” Clinton told supporters during a campaign speech at the American Legion National Conference in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Clinton and the Democratic Party have both had cyber-related in issues in recent months. The nominee was recently the subject of an FBI investigation for storing classified emails on a private server, while the Democratic National Committee (DNC) has fallen victim to hackers believed to be linked to Russia. Clinton was not afraid to accuse the Kremlin and China of backing such attacks. For the full article click here 



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Road to Skynet update – DARPA will use internet of things and AI to dominate cyberwar and regular war

The Defense Advance Research Projects Agency will fund the development of sensors and artificial intelligence systems that could help break into, extract, and analyze information from enemy devices and communication systems.

The components and systems will arm the U.S. with more data to analyze enemy moves and strategy. Information is king in wars, and DARPA wants to develop technology that can break into enemy systems.

“They are talking about going into any situation and extracting information at any time, [with] artificial intelligence systems that can attack and hack any network,” said Jim McGregor, principal analyst at Tirias Research.

DARPA wants to fund the development of sensors and electromagnetic systems that could break into point-to-point wired and wireless communications, even ones that are not linked to the internet. DARPA is making progress to jam resistant communication For the full article click here 



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Thursday, 1 September 2016

Clinton: Treat cyberattacks ‘like any other attack’

Hillary Clinton on Wednesday called for the U.S. to begin treating cyberattacks like any other assault on the country.

“As president, I will make it clear that the United States will treat cyberattacks just like any other attack,” the Democratic presidential nominee said. “We will be ready with serious political, economic and military responses.” Clinton called for the U.S. to “lead the world in setting the rules in cyberspace.”

“If America doesn’t, others will,” she said.

The remarks, given during a foreign policy speech at the American Legion Convention in Cincinnati, address one the central challenges the Obama administration has faced in responding to cyberattacks.

Without any international rules of engagement, officials must weigh a response to each attack individually — with the result being that the White House has often been accused of not having an adequate deterrence strategy. For the full article click here 



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Developing “Loud” Cyber Weapons

The U.S. military’s top cyber warfare unit is working to develop weapons distinctly different from those used by the intelligence community. . . .  [Cyber Command] is looking for tools that can be definitively traced back to the United States military, diverging from the ultra-stealth exploits often used at bureaus like the National Security Agency. . . . “In the intelligence community you never want to be caught, you want be low and slow, you never really want to be attributed. There’s a different paradigm from where you are at in the intelligence community,” said [the leader of] the Department of Defense’s capability and tool development project within Cyber Command.  “But there’s another space over here, where maybe you definitely want to be louder, where attribution is important to you and you actually want the adversary to know.”  . . . .The development of “loud” offensive cyber tools, able to possibly deter future intrusions, represent a “different paradigm shift” from what the agency has used to in the past.

Taking this requirement at face value raises a number of interesting questions.

  1. If the tool itself has to carry attribution markers identifying the United States as the perpetrator, how will we prevent Elbonia from scanning for those attribution markers and blocking artifacts with such markers from acting?
  2. How do we prevent Zendia (a 3rd party) from usurping U.S. attribution markers and using them in their own cyber weapons, thereby falsely implicating the United States for such use? For the full article click here 


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