Saturday, 26 November 2016

Senior charged in cyber attacks on Pennsylvania schools

MURRYSVILLE, Pa. (AP) — A senior has been charged with launching a cyber attack on her western Pennsylvania high school which wound up disrupting more than a dozen school district computer systems.

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review (http://bit.ly/2gbZ6h1 ) reports 18-year-old Michaela King, of Murrysville, has been charged with unlawfully using computers at Franklin Regional High School and another unspecified device in a series of attacks since Oct. 31.

Police say she used a program to launch denial of service attacks, which overwhelm computer systems with communication requests that disrupt legitimate computer traffic. For the full article click here 



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Russia launches cyber army in fear of cyber attacks

Russia’s launched a recruitment drive for so-called “cyber soldiers”, as it looks to boost its cyber capabilities amid global tension over the issue.

Moscow has been accused of using cyber-attacks against Western governments. That includes the United States, whose FBI said Moscow was behind recent leaks of Democratic Party emails. But Russia said it faces cyber threats from the U.S. and is therefore calling on specialists to join its forces.

CCTV’s Julia Lyubova reports from Moscow. For the full article click here 



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Friday, 25 November 2016

BlackBerry awarded Cyber Essentials Plus certification from the UK Government

BlackBerry has now announced they have become the first major mobile vendor to receive the new Cyber Essentials Plus (CE+) certification from the UK Government. Additionally, BlackBerry has announced they are now an accredited certifying body for Cyber Essentials Plus, with the certification being offered through BlackBerry Cybersecurity Services.

Today I’m proud to announce that BlackBerry has become the first major mobile vendor to receive the new Cyber Essentials Plus (CE+) certification from the UK Government. The base Cyber Essentials certification covers a wide range of security processes, including account management, firewall configuration, device configuration, backup processes and other security-related configurations. In order to obtain Cyber Essentials Plus, a qualified and authorized external tester needs to perform additional tests and checks within the organization, including an internal scan of the network, verification of account security for both standard users and administrative accounts, testing for defenses against malicious software installation via email and web browsing.

I’m also happy to announce that BlackBerry is now an accredited certifying body for Cyber Essentials Plus, meaning that we can help your business obtain its own Cyber Essentials certification. We’ve already helped government departments, product suppliers, manufacturers and administrative organizations achieve Cyber Essentials accreditation, and we’re excited to continue to help our customers and industry partners improve their cybersecurity programs. For the full article click here 



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NATO takes hybrid war threat posed by Russia seriously, Stoltenberg says

NATO takes serious view of deterring hybrid war threat posed by the Russian Federation.

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said Thursday delivering speech at the Oxford University, Censor.NET reports referring to Interfax-Ukraine.

Asked about Russia’s capability to wage hybrid war, NATO chief said that cyberattacks and those undercover operations which are referred to as “hybrid warfare” were a serious challenge.

The secretary-general stressed that this kind of threat was to some extent more urgent than the war in the classic sense of the term. Speaking about the cyber-attacks, he said that it was impossible to imagine some kind of modern conflict without a cyber component. For the full article click here 



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Thursday, 24 November 2016

Australia is waging a war against ISIS, away from the battlefields, in the cyber space

CANBERRA, Australia – Even as the war against ISIS intensifies on ground in both Iraq and Syria – Australia has now said that it has been waging a cyber war against the world’s most dangerous terrorist group.

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said in a message to the parliament on Wednesday that in addition to supporting allied forces in Iraq and Syria in the war against ISIS, Australia is using offensive cyber capabilities to fight the war in the virtual world.

Turnbull added that the country’s cyber war was making a real difference to operations in Syria and Iraq and was subject to international rules of engagement.

“I won’t, for obvious reasons, go into the details of those operations, I can say that they are being used, that they are making a real difference in the military conflict and that all offensive cyber activities in support of the Australian Defence Force and our allies are subject to the same rules of engagement which govern the use of our other military capabilities in Iraq and Syria, such as our F18 Hornets,” Turnbull explained. For the full article click here



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NFL Wi-Fi, cyberwar training, and hacking diabetes care: TechRepublic’s cover stories of 2016

At TechRepublic we don’t just tackle the latest technology trends and analyze their impact on the business world—we also like to dive deep and research the developments and discoveries that are shaping the future of the enterprise, government and commerce, and society as a whole.

The results of that research—our cover stories—give us a chance to really scratch that investigative journalism itch, to go beyond the headlines and offer compelling features on innovation, disruptive technologies, and the potential of risks and rewards of emerging platforms and solutions. In 2016 we’ve looked at industry topics like how the NFL has become a leader in massive-scale Wi-Fi and monetization, Dick’s Sporting Goods’ unique ecommerce philosophy, and GE’s 3D printing breakthroughs. That’s not all, though. We’ve also looked at issues of tech in government, like the future of cyberwarfare and what AI means for the global community. And we’ve tackled consumer issues, like the hacking of diabetes treatment tech. For the full article click here



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Wednesday, 23 November 2016

Organisations still failing to protect against cyber attacks, survey reveals

Charities are being encouraged to check they have adequate cyber security protection after a survey found that 26% of British organisations have left themselves open to cyber attacks.

The independent research carried out by Advanced, the UK’s third largest software and services provider, also revealed that nearly half (46%) claim that data security is not a deciding factor in adopting digital technology. This is despite recent government research into cyber security which found that two thirds of large organisations experienced a cyber breach or attack in the past year.

The survey aimed to identify the state of readiness amongst British organisations in the face of serious digital disruption, while highlighting the ingredients needed to compete and be successful in this era. As well as revealing serious gaps in preparing for a cyber attack, the survey also highlighted three key trends around the state of business readiness: economic, digital and customer. For the full article click here 



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Hackers Hijack Smart Devices, Analysts Warn of ‘Cyber War’

Baby monitors, thermostats, home surveillance cameras — these gadgets are not what comes to mind when picturing an evil army, but cybersecurity experts warn that malicious hackers are using common household smart devices to cause chaos and panic on the Internet, NBC 5 Chicago Investigates reported.

“How could a baby monitor become an evil device for a hacker?” said Darren Guccione, chief executive officer of Keeper Security, Inc. “We are in a cyberwar. There is no doubt we are in a cyberwar right now.”

Guccione said hackers are placing malicious software on vulnerable smart devices — those with weak usernames and passwords — to control them and attack third-party businesses. For the full article click here 



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Tuesday, 22 November 2016

To Operationalize Cyber, Humanize the Design

Cyberspace…the military riddle of the modern age.  Despite well-intentioned talk across the U.S. Army to ‘operationalize cyber,’ the indispensable means for doing so, is to ‘humanize’ the design.  Conventional U.S. Army wisdom proclaims cyber a ‘war fighting domain,’ and its networks the war-fighting platform. However, the problem with this linear logic is, where do humans fit?  This article asserts the need to expand the discussion about operational cyber, and challenges the convenience of simply wedging offensive and defensive notions into an artificial domain.  Instead, it advocates an accelerated cycle of learning and sharing, to build enterprise trust, and humanize the design.  Operationalizing cyber is not about linear thinking and lines of operation; it is about building trust in a process that speeds the cycle of individual education and branch collaboration.  Humanizing cyber requires every soldier to become cyber-aware and every branch to adapt cyber to its own distinctive cultures, missions, and needs.  The days of relegating cyber-thinking to communication and intelligence communities are over.  Cyber is a team event now, and requires as much creativity, diversity, and proliferation the U.S. Army can muster.

Design in an Information-Rich World

In 1978, renowned American computer scientist, economist, political scientist, psychologist, painter, pianist, and one of the most original thinkers of the 20th Century, the late Dr. Herbert Simon, was awarded the Nobel Prize for his contributions to the field of economics.  A quintessential polymath, Herbert Simon was an early pioneer in numerous fields of study, and in his lifetime, contributed many new theories, organizing principles, and ways to ponder a world rapidly inundating with information, computers, and technology.  Simon was ahead of his time, exploring cyberspace before the word was coined, and even co-authoring the first publication on artificial intelligence in 1956, long before the field was created. For the full article click here 



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Prevention vs. Detection: The Art of Cyber War

Fresh off his popular talk at the GE Digital Minds + Machines event in San Francisco, Masergy Chief Scientist Mike Stute discusses how the industrialization of hacking is transforming cybersecurity.

We’ve all seen cyberattacks become more sophisticated by the day. Perimeter defenses—the firewalls and antivirus clients used for years by enterprise IT—can’t keep up with the pace of hacker innovation. Cyberattacks are industrialized; products built and improved with each new iteration.

Masergy’s Mike Stute will explain:

  • How 3,300 year-old glass jewelry buried in King Tut’s tomb is directly related to modern-day information security
  • Why enterprises defending their network perimeter can never win against hackers
  • What makes detection the best strategy for mitigating a cyberattack For the full article click here 


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Monday, 21 November 2016

Three Mobile Cyber Attack: Six Million Customers’ Details Exposed

One of Britain’s biggest mobile phone companies, Three, has admitted to a major cyber-security breach which could have exposed six million customers’ personal data at risk. Three Mobile admitted that hackers have successfully accessed its customer upgrade database after using an employee login. IT security experts from Ping Identity, NSFOCUS, Security Company Centrify, Alert Logic, Lieberman Software, Redscan, Informatica, Intercede, ESET, Certes Networks, RES, Verizon, WhiteHat Security, Barracuda Networks, ForgeRock, ZoneFox, Glasswall Solutions, Post-Quantum, Vectra Networks, WinMagic and Ipswitch commented below.
Hans Zandbelt, Senior Technical Architect at Ping Identity:
Hans Zandbelt“Another high-profile data breach such as this reminds us that our identities are increasingly becoming the target for many sophisticated hackers, today. With the rise in ‘phantom employees’ and the insider threat, organisations must implement and invest in two-factor and multi-factor authentication to safeguard data and maintain customer loyalty. Our recent survey found that 90 percent of IT decision makers say identity and access management technologies are critical to succeeding at digital transformation. Businesses across the UK must prioritise this in 2017 and beyond.”

Stephen Gates, Chief Research Intelligence Analyst at NSFOCUS:
StephenGates_Professional“Here is yet another case of lackadaisical security controls. The first question is, how did hackers gain access to an employee’s credentials in the first place, and why wasn’t two factor authentications enforced for every employee? If so, this hack would have never taken place. A little inconvenience for employees logging in would have likely saved hundreds of thousands of pounds in fines. In this case, an ounce of prevention would have been much less, than the “pounds” of the cure they’ll likely have to consume.” For the full article click here 



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Experts warn Viet Nam about rising threat of cyber attacks

Speaking at the “New era of information security” seminar held to mark the 9th annual Viet Nam Information Security Day heard in HCM City on Thursday, Nguyen Trong Duong of the Viet Nam Computer Emergency Response Teams said: “We should list the losses damages from network attacks, review all our spending on network security and increase our awareness of this important problem.”

According to a report from the Viet Nam Information Security Association (VNISA), there has been an increase in the incidence of cyber attacks aimed at large corporations world-wide, including in Viet Nam.

“The attacks threaten not only companies’ business operations and assets but also national security and sovereignty,” Dr Nguyen Anh Tuan, deputy chairman of VNISA’s southern office, said.

The report stressed the importance of network security since cyber attacks have become a weapon to resolve conflicts between nations.

In the new era network protection should become a priority for all enterprises and nations, it said. For the full article click here 



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Friday, 18 November 2016

Will adding a selfie to your login prevent cyberattacks?

With the surge in high profile data breaches recently, are user names and passwords the best way to ensure the people logging into corporate networks are who they say they are?

ImageWare Systems is betting that businesses want better authentication — particularly for remote access from smartphones, tablets and laptops.

This week the San Diego company introduced a technology platform that allows users to meld biometrics into the traditional user name/password process for signing into a corporate network.

Instead of just logging into your system with a password, the new platform, called GoVerifyID, would prompt users to also take a selfie or speak a predetermined phrase into their smartphone microphone, or both. For the full article click here 



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Ignatius: Obama’s White House made itself clear on cyber attacks; will Trump’s?

The White House sent a secret “hotline”-style message to Russia on Oct. 31 to warn against any further cybermeddling in the U.S. election process. Russia didn’t escalate its tactics as Election Day approached, but U.S. officials aren’t ready to say that deterrence worked.

The previously undisclosed message was part of the high-stakes game of cyber brinkmanship that has been going on this year between Moscow and Washington. How to stabilize this relationship without appearing to capitulate to Russian pressure tactics is among the biggest challenges facing President-elect Donald Trump.

The message was sent on a special channel created in 2013 as part of the Nuclear-Risk Reduction Center, using a template designed for crisis communication. “It was a very clear statement to the Russians and asked them to stop their activity,” a senior administration official said, adding: “The fact that we used this channel was part of the messaging.” For the full article click here 



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Thursday, 17 November 2016

A National Security ‘To Do’ List for President-Elect Trump

As President-elect Trump mulls cabinet appointments, those who will help shape and police national security have their work cut out for them.  Challenges facing national security continue to be front and center on Main Street and in Washington. Whether it is the constant threat of terrorist actions, or the war against cops, security matters continue to be a primary reason Americans are losing sleep.

That’s why the formulation and implementation of a valid and reliable national security plan and team will be imperative. As such, these are the top five issues that will require prompt and effective implementation plans within the President-elect’s first 100 days in the Oval Office. For the full article click here 



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World’s hottest cybersecurity companies to watch in 2017

MENO PARK, CALIF., USA, November 16, 2016 /EINPresswire.com/ — Cybersecurity Ventures announces the Q4 2016 edition of the Cybersecurity 500, a global compilation of leading companies who provide cybersecurity solutions and services.

Selection Criteria & Expanded News Release Here

Worldwide spending on cybersecurity products and services is forecast to eclipse $1 trillion for the five-year period from 2017 to 2021, according to the Cybersecurity Market Report, published quarterly by Cybersecurity Ventures. There are many new entrants as well as M&A, investment and IPO activity, that is constantly changing the vendor and service provider landscape.

The Cybersecurity 500 creates awareness and recognition for the most innovative cybersecurity companies – ranging from the largest and most recognizable brands, to VC backed start-ups and emerging players, to small firms with potentially game-changing technologies, to solution providers poised for growth around productized or vertically focused services. For the full article click here 



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Wednesday, 16 November 2016

In our new Cold War, deterrence should come before detente

The White House sent a secret “hotline”-style message to Russia on Oct. 31 to warn against any further cyber-meddling in the U.S. election process. Russia didn’t escalate its tactics as Election Day approached, but U.S. officials aren’t ready to say deterrence worked.

The previously undisclosed message was part of the high-stakes game of cyber-brinkmanship that has been going on this year between Moscow and Washington. How to stabilize this relationship without appearing to capitulate to Russian pressure tactics is among the biggest challenges facing President-elect Donald Trump.

The message was sent on a special channel created in 2013 as part of the Nuclear Risk Reduction Center, using a template designed for crisis communication. “It was a very clear statement to the Russians and asked them to stop their activity,” a senior administration official said, adding: “The fact that we used this channel was part of the messaging.” For the full article click here



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Cybercrime and the War on Digital Free Speech



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Tuesday, 15 November 2016

A battle plan against cyber-war

The world got a glimpse of the future in October when a large-scale cyber-attack prevented access to hundreds of key websites, including Twitter, the online New York Times, and Amazon. The “distributed denial of service” attack against the New Hampshire-based DNS provider Dyn, which blocked access to major online services for users as far away as Europe, fulfilled the direst predictions of technologists and security researchers alike.

The attack exposed the clear reasons for concern about the coming age of an Internet of Things, in which more household devices are connected to the Web. What’s less immediately clear is what should be done to ensure the Internet’s most likely future iteration remains safe.

To date, the vast majority of disruptive and even destructive cyber-attacks have been the work of militaries, foreign intelligence services, or other state-sponsored hackers. These actors are usually operating under some degree of political direction and interests and tend to moderate their use of malicious code for disruptive or destructive purposes. For the full article click here 



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In The Lame Duck, How Congress Makes Cybersecurity A Non-Partisan Priority

With a lame duck session of Congress looming, federal lawmakers are scrambling to push key legislative items through last-minute. One key area of concern is cybersecurity.

Recent headlines have exposed a wide array of victims, ranging from both corporate to government entities. Stoking concerns is the ongoing controversy surrounding Russian hacking of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s campaign emails and the DNC, in a perceived effort to influence the outcome of the U.S. presidential election. Against this backdrop, several members of Congress have introduced amendments to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) to strengthen cybersecurity. Yet, is this enough?

It is without a doubt that the nature of war has changed. For centuries, war has been waged on battlefields and televised around the clock. Now, the theatre of war has shifted and is being waged on computer servers, in homes and at places of work. Not even our most secure government institutions are exempt—exposing troves of private, classified and sensitive information, putting at risk our economic, social and national security. For the full article click here 



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Monday, 14 November 2016

Russia attacks free thinking in America — the cyberwar threat

We are all victims — even those who can see the problem. America’s array of security agencies has confirmed that Russia has hacked personal and often private Americans’ emails. Spying on American citizens. The first step in cyberwar.

History proves the Russians are masters of propaganda and “thought-manipulation.” It is likely that Vladimir Putin is working with Wikileaks to selectively leak these emails. The second step in his cyberwar. Putin is conducting cyberwar on America and democracy. He is attempting to make Americans doubt the legitimacy of our elections.

According to Eric Chenowith, co-director of the Institute for Democracy in Eastern Europe, “Russian state television and other state directed media frequently report actual and fake information all blended together with the intent of promoting fear….” And I would add falsehoods. Russia encourages misinformation to exercise domination over its citizens thinking by covertly planting falsehood and sowing doubt, which helps to keep its elites in power.

Russia is the superpower of thought manipulation, and they have declared war on America. For the full article click here 



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A battle plan against cyber-war

The world got a glimpse of the future in October when a large-scale cyber-attack prevented access to hundreds of key websites, including Twitter, the online New York Times, and Amazon. The “distributed denial of service” attack against the New Hampshire-based DNS provider Dyn, which blocked access to major online services for users as far away as Europe, fulfilled the direst predictions of technologists and security researchers alike.

The attack exposed the clear reasons for concern about the coming age of an Internet of Things, in which more household devices are connected to the Web. What’s less immediately clear is what should be done to ensure the Internet’s most likely future iteration remains safe.

To date, the vast majority of disruptive and even destructive cyber-attacks have been the work of militaries, foreign intelligence services, or other state-sponsored hackers. These actors are usually operating under some degree of political direction and interests and tend to moderate their use of malicious code for disruptive or destructive purposes.

But according to Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, America’s top intelligence official, October’s attack was likely the work of a non-state actor, and his assessment has been backed up by reports from the private cybersecurity firm Flashpoint. For the full article click here 



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Saturday, 12 November 2016

Class-action lawsuit proposed in light of Casino Rama cyberattack

A class-action lawsuit is being proposed, following a cyberattack at Casino Rama.

On Friday, Charney Lawyers proposed a lawsuit that would seek $50 million in damages from Casino Rama.

“The class action will be commenced on behalf of employees, customers and vendors of the Casino Rama Resort whose confidential information was compromised by the privacy breach,” the lawyers said.

The statement of claim would be filed in Superior Court on Monday given the Remembrance Day holiday on Friday, said Ted Charney, one of the lawyers involved.

On Thursday, Casino Rama warned its customers, vendors as well as current and former staff to keep an eye on their bank accounts, credit cards and other financial information. For the full article click here



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Post-election Russian hacker cyberattacks evade malware detection

Friday, 11 November 2016

What’s Trump’s stance on cyber warfare and Net Neutrality?

At around 3:00 a.m. (CT), American businessman, television personality, and Republican presidential candidate Donald J. Trump received a call by from Hillary Clinton. She congratulated him for winning the US Presidential election 2016.

Trump’s victory makes him the 45th POTUS, who will begin his term next year.

Many sources regard his triumph as widely unexpected, even though he never failed to appeal to the largest sectors of the population.

Trump won key states such as Florida, Michigan, and Ohio last night, some of them historically Democrat. For the full article click here 



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How Will Cyber-Security Fare Under President Trump?

History was rewritten as Donald Trump was declared the 45th President of the United States in an unexpected turn of events on Election Day. Subsequently, experts are busy decoding the impact on various cited issues—cyber-security being at the core of policy-making. Forrester Research has predicted that with Trump in the top-seat, the current unfolding cyber crisis will continue—in fact, it will intensify. The research predicts a major cyber crisis within 100 days of his taking up office. There is more than enough reason to worry, as no one is sure how Trump will address the ongoing and expected cyber-attacks! The gravest worry is that he may not be the best person to tackle cyber-terrorism, as common opinion goes.

The United States has seen bad days in the cyber-security realm, with various cyber-rigs. Hack attacks on companies and critical servers, data theft from the Office of Personnel Management, and last month’s attack on Dyn’s managed domain name service—not to mention the entire controversy around WikiLeaks and the US elections themselves. These are just some of the examples in US’s cyber-war! This is just the start, and the virtual world can expect things to get far worse, going ahead. Where is the detailed, foolproof plan to deal with the dilemma?

Though a business tycoon, Trump is not one with a trustworthy approach towards cyber-policy. His plan seems to be vague and weak. Some of his campaign pledges in the cyber-security realm, have included reviewing cyber-defences for vulnerabilities and spreading cyber-awareness amongst government employees through training. He stated with conviction that “we had to get very, very tough on cyber and cyber warfare” with no specifics on the “what” and “how” of this statement. For the full article click here 



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Thursday, 10 November 2016

Chinese Government Implements Cybersecurity Law Designed To Spy On Citizens, Quell Dissent

from the protected-from-everything-but-their-own-government dept

The Chinese government is going in for a third pass on its “cybersecurity” law — one that has little to do with security and everything to do with control.

This is something the government has been working on for a few years now. It’s a chance for it to tame the “Wild West” internet, particularly the “West” part of it with all these ideals about free speech and the spreading of information. The third reading, with all alterations and additions appended, will likely be going into effect this week. Human Rights Watch has a long post detailing the law’s negative aspects — which is almost all of them.

Among other things, service providers will be forced to censor “prohibited content.” They’ll also be required to collect real names and other identifying user information, even if the only service provided is instant messaging.

There’s also an information-sharing plan not unlike the one the US government has set up for its cyberwar operations. The difference is that the Chinese government makes no pretense about two-way sharing. It simply demands companies turn over harvested info and other data. For the full article click here 



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Donald Trump: ‘Cyber theft is the fastest growing crime in the United States by far’

Wednesday, 9 November 2016

NATO announces largest troop deployments against Russia since Cold War

NATO will place hundreds of thousands of troops on alert for military action against Russia in the coming months, top NATO officials told the Times of London on Monday.

The US-led military alliance is planning to speed up the mobilization of forces numbering in the tens of thousands and, ultimately, hundreds of thousands and millions that are to be mobilized against Russia. Beyond its existing 5,000-strong emergency response force, NATO is tripling its “incumbent response force” to 40,000 and putting hundreds of thousands of troops on higher alert levels.

The Times wrote, “Sir Adam West, Britain’s outgoing permanent representative to NATO, said he thought that the goal was to speed up the response time of up to 300,000 military personnel to about two months. At present a force of this size could take up to 180 days to deploy.” For the full article click here 



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THE BEST STRATEGY FOR CYBER-CONFLICT MAY NOT BE A CYBER-STRATEGY

It would be an understatement to say that Obama administration officials have been a bit vague when asked how they intended to retaliate for Russian meddling in the presidential election via hacks of Democratic Party organs. “[T]here are a range of responses that are available to the President,” White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest told reporters, “and he will consider a response that is proportional.” Homeland Security Advisor Lisa Monaco was more expansive if no more specific, stating:

We will respond in a time and place and manner of our choosing, and when we do so, we will consider a full range of tools, economic, diplomatic, criminal law enforcement, military, and some of those responses may be public, some of them may not be.

One analyst derided the vice president’s pronouncements on the topic as “Biden threatening to threaten Russia.”

To be fair, Earnest was correct when he lamented last week that “the rules of the road when it comes to cybersecurity in large part are not well-established, and that makes it difficult” to devise a response to state-sponsored cyberattacks. Yet the problem runs much deeper than awkward press briefings. Despite the broad consensus regarding the threat malicious cyber activity poses to U.S. interests, the United States has failed to articulate or formulate a successful strategy for cyber conflict. For the full article click here 



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Tuesday, 8 November 2016

Islamic State’s ‘dark universe': cyberwar, killer drones and poison clouds

BEIRUT, Lebanon — As Iraqi forces tighten the noose around the Islamic State-held city of Mosul in northern Iraq, they face a cun­ning and murderous foe who has had two years to dig in and is fight­ing back with a ferocious campaign of scorched-earth tactics, suicide bombers, toxic sulphur-laced clouds, a morale-sapping cyber campaign and high-grade bombs, some of them assembled by slave labor, that could remain a danger for years to come.

The Islamic State’s ordnance production is no longer restricted to a small cadre of bomb-makers, veterans of the jihadist wars, but is run on what military experts say is an industrial scale. Iraqi and Kurdish officials say this has been achieved through a network of factories using some of the thousands of slaves IS has amassed since 2014 when it seized one-third of Iraq. For the full article click here 



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Hacked Kremlin Emails Could Signal a Turn in the U.S.-Russia Cyberwar

Though a Ukrainian hacking group has claimed responsibility for hacking the emails of Vladislav Surkov, experts suspect the involvement of U.S. intelligence agencies

Before they pulled off one of the most embarrassing cyber heistsever to hit the Kremlin, the hackers from the Ukrainian Cyber Alliance, who styled themselves as the online shock troops in Ukraine’s conflict with Russia, weren’t really on the radar. They had mostly spent the last two years on easy targets—the computers and cell phones of Russia-backed separatist rebels in eastern Ukraine, who are not known for their discipline when it comes to virus protection or, for that matter, anything else. Every once in a while, the hackers would also deface a Russian website, the cyber equivalent of spray-painting graffiti. For the full article click here 



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Monday, 7 November 2016

Inside the CIA, sweeping reforms during the age of cyberwar

WASHINGTON — When America goes to the polls on Nov. 8, according to current and former U.S. intelligence officials, it will likely experience the culmination of a new form of information war.

A months-long campaign backed by the Russian government to undermine the credibility of the U.S. presidential election — through hacking, cyber attacks and disinformation campaigns — is likely to peak on voting day, the officials said.

Russian officials deny any such effort. But current and former U.S. officials warn that hackers could post fictional evidence online of widespread voter fraud, slow the Internet to a crawl through cyber attacks and release a final tranche of hacked emails, including some that could be doctored.

“Don’t underestimate what they can do or will do. We have to be prepared,” said Leon Panetta, who served as CIA director and defense secretary in President Barack Obama’s first term. “In some ways, they are succeeding at disrupting our process. Until they pay a price, they will keep doing it.” For the full article click here 



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US Russia War: Pentagon Warns Russia Not To Meddle In Elections

The US Russia war had gone cyber. Pentagon warns the Kremlin to forget plans on hacking the government’s computer programs in an attempt to jam the presidential elections next week.

The warning came after the Hacker Guccifer 2.0, believed to be a  Russian spy agency, publicly announced that they would monitor the US elections “from inside the system.”

US Russia War: Online battlefield ready

The CIA’s (Central Intelligence Agency) top-secret records and officials revealed that Washington has already infiltrated Moscow’s electric framework, broadcast communication systems,  and Russian President Vladimir Putin’s command database. These, according to the organization, is to “set up the combat zone” by leaving infection-ridden digital weapons known as “malware”. The online virus would then empower the US military to totally close down Putin’s war capacities. For the full article click here 



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Saturday, 5 November 2016

Criminals Trying to Take an Entire Country Offline with Massive DDoS Attacks – Testing Cyber Weapons?

Cyber criminals are now using Mirai malware to take down the entire internet infrastructure of Liberia. The African nation was targeted by the same cyber weapon that caused the largest ever cyber attack of the history, just two weeks ago.

Mirai malware was used in October to launch a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that affected some of the world’s biggest online sites and services. The attack was launched using a growing network of infected internet-connected devices that sent 1.1Tbps traffic.

The source code was publicly released by a cybercriminal earlier in October, causing the East Coast cyber attack. Mirai malware is designed to scan for insecure IoT devices, using them to send massive amounts of traffic, causing service disruption.

Security experts had warned that the October DDoS attack was just a start of an expected onslaught of upcoming cyber attacks – of even larger scale. They believe that future DDoS attacks could reach to 10 Tbps traffic, enough to take down the internet infrastructure of an entire country. For the full article click here 



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‘Zero Days’ director Alex Gibney on cyberwar, Russian interference in the election and secrecy

When Alex Gibney released “Zero Days,” his movie about the Stuxnet program that slowed Iran’s nuclear development, this year, his portrait of the unsettled state of cyberwarfare was already unnervingly relevant. But in the months since, the Democratic National Committee suffered a severe hack, a massive distributed denial of service attack shut down many Internet-based services for East Coast users and WikiLeaks began publishing John Podesta’s private emails. So it’s no surprised that Showtime moved up the air date for “Zero Days” to Saturday at 9 p.m. Gibney and I spoke in early October; our conversation has been edited for clarity and length.

What has it been like to release the movie in a context where some of its scariest predictions seem to be coming true?

Well, it’s unfortunately gratifying. I don’t know how better to put it. When we were making the movie, many people sort of rolled their eyes as if it was somehow abstract. And yet since the movie’s come out, you can see it rolling through the headlines every day, whether it be the DNC hack, the Russian hacks on the election machines. And back in just before the Berlin Festival, there was the presumed Russian assault on the Ukrainian power grid. So, yeah, it’s happening all around us. For the full article click here 



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Friday, 4 November 2016

Hillary Clinton Will Start World War III

Nov. 1—Throughout her campaign for President of the United States, Hillary Clinton has seized upon every opportunity to demonize Russia and Russian President Vladimir Putin. She has accused him of interfering in the U.S. presidential elections through sophisticated cyber-warfare. She has accused Putin and Russia of plotting an invasion and reconquest of the three Baltic States, which all happen to be members of the NATO Alliance. She has accused Putin and Russia of grabbing the Crimea and of plotting to take over eastern Ukraine, totally ignoring the fact that her longtime protege, Victoria Nuland, oversaw the bloody Maidan coup that installed a Banderist, pro-fascist regime in power in Kiev. She has charged Russia with war crimes and other atrocities in Syria, as the Obama Administration, in which she served, backs jihadists from Al Qaeda and allied foreign terrorist groups in their grab for power in Damascus.

Clinton and her campaign surrogates have even accused Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump of being a KGB dupe or asset, simply on the basis of the GOP nominee’s pledge to negotiate with Russia, and his acknowledgement that Putin is a strong leader—something that Clinton herself seems to be acknowledging, given her larger-than-life accusations that the Russian leader is out to conquer the world.

All of this would be tragi-comic, were it not for the real-world consequences. If Hillary Clinton is elected President on Nov. 8, there is a greatly heightened probability that her actions will rapidly lead to confrontation with Russia—and that will assuredly lead to World War III, a war fought on a global scale with thermonuclear weapons, meaning the end of life on Earth as we know it. For the full article click here 



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The Internet of Things Is a Cyberwar Nightmare

The world got a glimpse of the future last month when a large-scale cyberattack prevented access to hundreds of key websites, including Twitter, the online New York Times, and Amazon. The “distributed denial of service” attack against the New Hampshire-based DNS provider Dyn, which blocked access to major online services for users as far away as Europe, fulfilled the direst predictions of technologists and security researchers alike.

The attack exposed the clear reasons for concern about the coming age of an Internet of Things, in which more household devices are connected to the web. What’s less immediately clear is what should be done to ensure the internet’s most likely future iteration remains safe.

To date, the vast majority of disruptive and even destructive cyberattacks have been the work of militaries, foreign intelligence services, or other state-sponsored hackers. These actors are usually operating under some degree of political direction and interests and tend to moderate their use of malicious code for disruptive or destructive purposes. For the full article click here 



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Thursday, 3 November 2016

The Russia-Microsoft CyberWar is Underway

Microsoft Corp said on Tuesday that a hacking group previously linked to the Russian government and U.S. political hacks was behind recent cyber attacks that exploited a newly discovered Windows security flaw.

The software maker said in an advisory on its website there had been a small number of attacks using “spear phishing” emails from a hacking group known Strontium, which is more widely known as “Fancy Bear,” or APT 28. Microsoft did not identify any victims.

Russia is not just sitting back.  On Wednesday Putin basically banned Microsoft and the business service LinkedIn from operating in the country, according to NBC News For the full article click here 



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Is the CIA Ready for the Age of Cyberwar?

When America goes to the polls on November 8, according to current and former U.S. intelligence officials, it will likely experience the culmination of a new form of information war. A months-long campaign backed by the Russian government to undermine the credibility of the U.S. presidential election—through hacking, cyberattacks, and disinformation campaigns—is likely to peak on voting day, the officials said.

Russian officials deny any such effort. But current and former U.S. officials warn that hackers could post fictional evidence online of widespread voter fraud, release a final tranche of embarrassing hacked emails, and slow the internet to a crawl through cyberattacks.

“Don’t underestimate what they can do or will do. We have to be prepared,” Leon Panetta, who served as Central Intelligence Agency director and defense secretary in President Barack Obama’s first term, told me. “In some ways, they are succeeding at disrupting our process. Until they pay a price, they will keep doing it.” For the full article click here 



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Wednesday, 2 November 2016

Britain’s focus on Islamic extremism is masking a prominent threat to national security — Russia

Russia is a growing threat to the United Kingdom and is using an arsenal of sophisticated tools to covertly destabilise the country, according to MI5 chief Andrew Parker.

In an extended interview with The Guardian newspaper, Parker said while most attention is paid to the threat of Islamic extremism in light of recent attacks in Europe, Russia’s use of covert action make it a prominent and serious threat to the United Kingdom.

Parker, who heads the UK’s chief security and counter-intelligence service, claimed Russian spies are currently active on British streets, using cyber warfare to infiltrate confidential areas like government policy and military operations.

“It [Russia] is using its whole range of state organs and powers to push its foreign policy abroad in increasingly aggressive ways — involving propaganda, espionage, subversion and cyber-attacks,” Parker said. For the full article click here 



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About Friday’s Mass Hack Attack

Summary

The distressing emails started coming in on Friday, October 21st like SOS signals from a sinking ship.

First, AWeber went down, stopping me from sending out newsletters and Trade Alerts.

Then Interactive Brokers crashed, making options price updates impossible.

Suddenly, Yahoo Mail wouldn’t take attachments.

Then Twitter went down.

Yikes!

What in the world was going on?

Was this a Soviet hack attack prior to a full scale nuclear strike?

Or was it the END OF THE WORLD?

Cyber security firms were baffled over how quickly and widespread the attack became. Many thought that this was the biggest such attack in Internet history.

I asked one my friends at security giant, Palo Alto Networks (NYSE:PANW), if it was the Russians again. He replied, “You better hope it’s the Russians.”

The implication being that the Internet may have launched the attack itself.

What made this attack so damaging was that it was focused on a single company, Manchester, NH based Dyn, one of several companies that host the Domain Name System (DNS), essentially a switchboard for the Internet.

DNS is what allows computers to speak to each other. No DNS, no Internet.

The other unusual aspect of this attack is that it was launched from millions of home appliances, like baby monitors, refrigerators and home security systems, instead of unsuspecting home computers. For the full article click here 



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Tuesday, 1 November 2016

Checklist for a U.S.-Russia Cyberwar

Following the hack of the Democratic National Committee, many in Congress and elsewhere have called on the United States to retaliate against Russia, the country the Obama administration says is the perpetrator.

The administration is reported to be seriously contemplating a response. While doing so may be satisfying and worthwhile, whether and how to respond is hardly a simple matter. Many questions need to be addressed before going ahead.

What are the stakes?

Assuming it is the perpetrator, Russia has clearly tampered with the U.S. election process by stealing and revealing political information that was private and had every right to be. That was bad. Be that as it may, keep in mind that leaked DNC computer files are not the only information that has been put into the public domain surreptitiously (see Trump tax returns and various interviews that have surfaced). For the full article click here 



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Next steps after attribution: Deterring further Russian interference

A few weeks ago, the U.S. government issued a statement declaring that Russia has been engineering disclosures of communications from U.S. political organizations and operators in an attempt to influence the upcoming U.S. presidential election. This is the first public, official acknowledgment of a long-running information warfare campaign that the statement asserted could have been authorized only by “Russia’s senior-most officials.”

Publicizing Russia’s role and warning the American people undermines Russia’s efforts as the campaign moves forward. In fact, we have already seen examples of public figures, including a prominent Republican politician, trying to push the disclosures from the spotlight as their link to Russia has become apparent.

But it’s unlikely that publicity alone will be enough to check this aggression. In fact, Russian President Vladimir Putin already has dismissed the attribution as nothing but hysteria. The discussion in the U.S. about next steps has focused on cyber-enabled counterattacks that would expose corruption in Russia or leak information about bank accounts linked to Putin. For the full article click here 



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